A feasibility study of a personalised lifestyle programme (HealthForce) for individuals who have participated in cardiovascular risk screening

The HealthForece Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the feasibility of a lifestyle intervention, focusing on diet and activity, in adults participating in cardiovascular screening.

Methods: The 12-week lifestyle intervention comprised three personalised counselling sessions plus telephone contact. Outcome data were collected by anthropometry, activity monitoring and lifestyle questionnaires. Acceptability of study measures was assessed by questionnaire and the intervention delivery by in-depth interviews.

Results: Between June 2008 and March 2009, 75 (62%) of 121 eligible individuals were recruited from Tayside, Scotland. Randomisation was to intervention (IV) (n= 55) or comparison group (CG) (n= 20). Retention was 99% across both groups. In the IV group, 63% increased moderate-vigorous activity by ≥ 30. minutes/week, 82% successfully maintained or lost weight (mean loss 1.1. kg, and 2.6. cm waist circumference) and 85% reported eating five portions of fruit and vegetables compared with 56% at baseline. No behaviour changes were detected in the CG. Feedback highlighted the value of lifestyle "checks," realising that current habits were sub-optimal, receiving personalised advice on specific behaviours, and feeling "healthier" through participation.

Conclusions: HealthForce was feasible to deliver and implement, acceptable to participants, and associated with reported changes in health behaviours over a 12-week period. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: 38976321.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)387-389
Number of pages3
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume52
Issue number5
Early online date17 Mar 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
Life Style
Anthropometry
Health Behavior
Scotland
Waist Circumference
Random Allocation
Telephone
Vegetables
Habits
Counseling
Weight Loss
Fruit
Emotions
Randomized Controlled Trials
Eating
Interviews
Diet
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

@article{b9766443d4a1433185d30604509ed62c,
title = "A feasibility study of a personalised lifestyle programme (HealthForce) for individuals who have participated in cardiovascular risk screening",
abstract = "Objective: To assess the feasibility of a lifestyle intervention, focusing on diet and activity, in adults participating in cardiovascular screening.Methods: The 12-week lifestyle intervention comprised three personalised counselling sessions plus telephone contact. Outcome data were collected by anthropometry, activity monitoring and lifestyle questionnaires. Acceptability of study measures was assessed by questionnaire and the intervention delivery by in-depth interviews.Results: Between June 2008 and March 2009, 75 (62{\%}) of 121 eligible individuals were recruited from Tayside, Scotland. Randomisation was to intervention (IV) (n= 55) or comparison group (CG) (n= 20). Retention was 99{\%} across both groups. In the IV group, 63{\%} increased moderate-vigorous activity by ≥ 30. minutes/week, 82{\%} successfully maintained or lost weight (mean loss 1.1. kg, and 2.6. cm waist circumference) and 85{\%} reported eating five portions of fruit and vegetables compared with 56{\%} at baseline. No behaviour changes were detected in the CG. Feedback highlighted the value of lifestyle {"}checks,{"} realising that current habits were sub-optimal, receiving personalised advice on specific behaviours, and feeling {"}healthier{"} through participation.Conclusions: HealthForce was feasible to deliver and implement, acceptable to participants, and associated with reported changes in health behaviours over a 12-week period. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: 38976321.",
author = "{The HealthForece Team} and Craigie, {Angela M.} and Barton, {Karen L.} and Maureen Macleod and Brian Williams and {van Teijlingen}, Edwin and Belch, {Jill J. F.} and Anderson, {Annie S.}",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.03.010",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "387--389",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "5",

}

A feasibility study of a personalised lifestyle programme (HealthForce) for individuals who have participated in cardiovascular risk screening. / The HealthForece Team.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 52, No. 5, 01.05.2011, p. 387-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A feasibility study of a personalised lifestyle programme (HealthForce) for individuals who have participated in cardiovascular risk screening

AU - The HealthForece Team

AU - Craigie, Angela M.

AU - Barton, Karen L.

AU - Macleod, Maureen

AU - Williams, Brian

AU - van Teijlingen, Edwin

AU - Belch, Jill J. F.

AU - Anderson, Annie S.

PY - 2011/5/1

Y1 - 2011/5/1

N2 - Objective: To assess the feasibility of a lifestyle intervention, focusing on diet and activity, in adults participating in cardiovascular screening.Methods: The 12-week lifestyle intervention comprised three personalised counselling sessions plus telephone contact. Outcome data were collected by anthropometry, activity monitoring and lifestyle questionnaires. Acceptability of study measures was assessed by questionnaire and the intervention delivery by in-depth interviews.Results: Between June 2008 and March 2009, 75 (62%) of 121 eligible individuals were recruited from Tayside, Scotland. Randomisation was to intervention (IV) (n= 55) or comparison group (CG) (n= 20). Retention was 99% across both groups. In the IV group, 63% increased moderate-vigorous activity by ≥ 30. minutes/week, 82% successfully maintained or lost weight (mean loss 1.1. kg, and 2.6. cm waist circumference) and 85% reported eating five portions of fruit and vegetables compared with 56% at baseline. No behaviour changes were detected in the CG. Feedback highlighted the value of lifestyle "checks," realising that current habits were sub-optimal, receiving personalised advice on specific behaviours, and feeling "healthier" through participation.Conclusions: HealthForce was feasible to deliver and implement, acceptable to participants, and associated with reported changes in health behaviours over a 12-week period. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: 38976321.

AB - Objective: To assess the feasibility of a lifestyle intervention, focusing on diet and activity, in adults participating in cardiovascular screening.Methods: The 12-week lifestyle intervention comprised three personalised counselling sessions plus telephone contact. Outcome data were collected by anthropometry, activity monitoring and lifestyle questionnaires. Acceptability of study measures was assessed by questionnaire and the intervention delivery by in-depth interviews.Results: Between June 2008 and March 2009, 75 (62%) of 121 eligible individuals were recruited from Tayside, Scotland. Randomisation was to intervention (IV) (n= 55) or comparison group (CG) (n= 20). Retention was 99% across both groups. In the IV group, 63% increased moderate-vigorous activity by ≥ 30. minutes/week, 82% successfully maintained or lost weight (mean loss 1.1. kg, and 2.6. cm waist circumference) and 85% reported eating five portions of fruit and vegetables compared with 56% at baseline. No behaviour changes were detected in the CG. Feedback highlighted the value of lifestyle "checks," realising that current habits were sub-optimal, receiving personalised advice on specific behaviours, and feeling "healthier" through participation.Conclusions: HealthForce was feasible to deliver and implement, acceptable to participants, and associated with reported changes in health behaviours over a 12-week period. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: 38976321.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.03.010

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.03.010

M3 - Article

VL - 52

SP - 387

EP - 389

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

IS - 5

ER -