A validation of the Psychological Vulnerability Scale and its use in chronic pain

Hilary Selbie*, Blair H. Smith, Alison M. Elliott, Saskia Teunisse, W. Alastair Chambers, Philip C. Hannaford

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychological intervention may be effective in chronic pain. A brief, valid and reliable screening tool may assist the targeting of appropriate intervention in primary care. We tested the Psychological Vulnerability Scale (PVS) for use in future community-based studies. A postal questionnaire was sent to 160 adults sampled from a general practice in North East Scotland, and to 40 adults from a hospital-based pain management clinic. The questionnaire included the SF-36, the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG) and chronic pain definition questionnaire. Factor analysis identified one relevant factor with a high eigenvalue of 3.65. All correlations with the SF-36 were significant. The PVS had good internal consistency and moderate test-retest scores, showing the PVS to be a reliable instrument for use in a general population sample. The difference in PVS total score between the pain clinic and general population sample was highly significant (p = 0.006). 32% of community-based individuals with chronic pain and 49% of pain clinic attendees had high psychological vulnerability. Further work is required to assess the usefulness of the PVS in future chronic pain research and clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-162
Number of pages10
JournalPain Clinic
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Chronic Pain
Psychology
Pain Clinics
Scotland
Pain Management
General Practice
Population
Statistical Factor Analysis
Primary Health Care
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Selbie, H., Smith, B. H., Elliott, A. M., Teunisse, S., Chambers, W. A., & Hannaford, P. C. (2004). A validation of the Psychological Vulnerability Scale and its use in chronic pain. Pain Clinic, 16(2), 153-162. https://doi.org/10.1163/156856904774134352
Selbie, Hilary ; Smith, Blair H. ; Elliott, Alison M. ; Teunisse, Saskia ; Chambers, W. Alastair ; Hannaford, Philip C. / A validation of the Psychological Vulnerability Scale and its use in chronic pain. In: Pain Clinic. 2004 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 153-162.
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Selbie, H, Smith, BH, Elliott, AM, Teunisse, S, Chambers, WA & Hannaford, PC 2004, 'A validation of the Psychological Vulnerability Scale and its use in chronic pain', Pain Clinic, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 153-162. https://doi.org/10.1163/156856904774134352

A validation of the Psychological Vulnerability Scale and its use in chronic pain. / Selbie, Hilary; Smith, Blair H.; Elliott, Alison M.; Teunisse, Saskia; Chambers, W. Alastair; Hannaford, Philip C.

In: Pain Clinic, Vol. 16, No. 2, 13.07.2004, p. 153-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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