A working identity: pre-professional status in nursing and the ethics of care

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

The emergence of a working identity, or pre-professional identity (PPI), is an important part of the socialization process for students in higher education and in particular those on vocational programs involving placements within the professional setting. Learning professional roles and workplace cultures are crucial to this process although situations may arise where these aspects may bring about role tension and a sense of conflict. An example of such conflict can occur in the field of nursing where students may find that their professional ethics must override situations where workplace practices or cultures lead to instances of poor patient care, unsafe practices or maltreatment. In such cases, professional codes of practice require nurses, including student nurses, to report these instances to senior colleagues. However, the potentially conflicting demands of being part of a workplace culture while reconciling the
personal and professional requirement to uphold patient safety and ethical standards can give rise to situations where such matters are left unreported. This issue is explored through an examination of student nurse accounts of their decisions to either report or remain silent on matters of poor care or practice. These accounts were drawn from semi-structured interviews and were initially analyzed with a focus on the types and range of justifications and excuses for either reporting or failing to report poor care practices. These accounts are re-analyzed with a focus on the development of PPI in terms of identity, occupational socialization and the ethics of care.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLanguage, identity and community
EditorsKamila Ciepiela
Place of PublicationBerlin
PublisherPeter Lang
Pages223-246
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9783631776025
ISBN (Print)9783631774090
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2019

Publication series

NameLodz studies in language
Volume62
ISSN (Print)1437-5281

Fingerprint

nursing
moral philosophy
nurse
workplace
occupational socialization
student
professional ethics
maltreatment
patient care
socialization
examination
interview
learning
education

Cite this

Moir, J. (2019). A working identity: pre-professional status in nursing and the ethics of care. In K. Ciepiela (Ed.), Language, identity and community (1st ed., pp. 223-246). (Lodz studies in language; Vol. 62). Berlin: Peter Lang. https://doi.org/10.3726/b14989
Moir, James. / A working identity : pre-professional status in nursing and the ethics of care. Language, identity and community. editor / Kamila Ciepiela. 1st. ed. Berlin : Peter Lang, 2019. pp. 223-246 (Lodz studies in language).
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Moir, J 2019, A working identity: pre-professional status in nursing and the ethics of care. in K Ciepiela (ed.), Language, identity and community. 1st edn, Lodz studies in language, vol. 62, Peter Lang, Berlin, pp. 223-246. https://doi.org/10.3726/b14989

A working identity : pre-professional status in nursing and the ethics of care. / Moir, James.

Language, identity and community. ed. / Kamila Ciepiela. 1st. ed. Berlin : Peter Lang, 2019. p. 223-246 (Lodz studies in language; Vol. 62).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Moir J. A working identity: pre-professional status in nursing and the ethics of care. In Ciepiela K, editor, Language, identity and community. 1st ed. Berlin: Peter Lang. 2019. p. 223-246. (Lodz studies in language). https://doi.org/10.3726/b14989