Academic tutoring in the era of centralised student processes

Research output: Other contribution

Abstract

In an era where efficiency and effectiveness have led to the centralisation of many student support services it is vital that the role of the academic tutor in providing guidance is not lost. Teaching, research, and administration can lead to competing demands on time however, the advice that academic staff provide can be crucial to student success. Higher education is now characterised by a more diverse student body and a sense of ‘belonging’ has often been cited as key to student retention. Academics can help foster this concept by ensuring that they lend an empathetic ear while signposting students to specialist help, if relevant. This case study outlines from a student and staff perspective the operation of academic tutoring.
Original languageEnglish
TypeCase study
Media of outputtext
PublisherThe Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education
Number of pages2
Place of PublicationGlasgow
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

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student
staff
student body
teaching research
centralization
tutor
efficiency
education
time

Cite this

Cameron, A. J. (2016, Apr). Academic tutoring in the era of centralised student processes. Glasgow: The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education.
Cameron, Andrea J. / Academic tutoring in the era of centralised student processes. 2016. Glasgow : The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. 2 p.
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Cameron, AJ 2016, Academic tutoring in the era of centralised student processes. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, Glasgow.

Academic tutoring in the era of centralised student processes. / Cameron, Andrea J.

2 p. Glasgow : The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. 2016, Case study.

Research output: Other contribution

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