Applying the self in learning

Sheila J. Cunningham, David J. Turk

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

    Abstract

    This research assessed potential educational applications of the ‘self-reference effect’ in memory. 42 six- to eight-year old children were asked to learn novel words (alien names) and information (alien characteristics) in one of two conditions: ‘self-referent’ (generate sentences describing how they would spend a day with each alien) or ‘other-referent’ (generate sentences describing how another character would spend a day with each alien). Memory for the aliens’ names and characteristics was then assessed. Results showed that participants who encoded the information under self-referent conditions performed better on the memory test. This novel finding suggests that self-referencing could improve children’s learning.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages27-28
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 27 Jun 2011
    Event9th Biennial Conference of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition - The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, United States
    Duration: 27 Jun 201129 Jun 2011
    Conference number: 9
    http://www.sarmac.org/s/SARMAC_IX_2011.pdf
    http://www.sarmac.org/conference-archive

    Conference

    Conference9th Biennial Conference of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition
    Abbreviated titleSARMAC IX
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    CityNew York
    Period27/06/1129/06/11
    Internet address

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