Assessing the risks of legacy SUDS in a public drainage authority

M. Lucey, C. Jefferies, A. Duffy, D. Buchan

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    Scottish Water, the public drainage authority in Scotland, is required through recent legislation to take into ownership a variety of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems, (SUDS). This paper examines the route involved in establishing the transfer of ownership (termed vesting) for non-standard “legacy” SUDS installations which are those constructed prior to the publication of Scottish Water‟s design guidance in 2007 which only considers the vesting of detention ponds and basins.

    Scottish Water has historically had an aversion to high risk when vesting new assets. The business requires all of their drainage networks to be extremely robust and fit for purpose. As a public drainage authority, some types of SUDS give rise to much greater long term ownership, operational and maintenance concerns than others. Non-standard legacy SUDS, such as filter trenches, swales and wetlands, all cause concerns to the business since they might give problems in construction and performance and cause long-term maintenance costs, as well as posing health and safety issues.

    The vesting process delineates the detailed steps to be undertaken by internal and external stakeholders from the receipt of a vesting application through remedial works and on to final acceptance. Within this process the legacy SUDS are technically assessed against benchmarks depending on when they were constructed. This paper outlines the technical valisation assessment procedure used as a negotiation tool to allow Scottish Water and the developer to move forward and agree remediation measures that ensure outcomes that deliver value for money for both parties.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages8
    Publication statusPublished - 13 Sep 2011
    Event12th International Conference on Urban Drainage - Hotel Plaza São Rafael Convention Center, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    Duration: 11 Sep 201116 Sep 2011
    Conference number: 12
    http://www.acquacon.com.br/icud2011/en/index.php

    Conference

    Conference12th International Conference on Urban Drainage
    Abbreviated titleICUD
    CountryBrazil
    CityPorto Alegre
    Period11/09/1116/09/11
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

    urban drainage
    drainage
    ownership
    water
    drainage network
    health and safety
    trench
    legislation
    stakeholder
    remediation
    pond
    wetland
    public
    drainage system
    filter
    basin
    cost

    Cite this

    Lucey, M., Jefferies, C., Duffy, A., & Buchan, D. (2011). Assessing the risks of legacy SUDS in a public drainage authority. Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Urban Drainage, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Lucey, M. ; Jefferies, C. ; Duffy, A. ; Buchan, D. / Assessing the risks of legacy SUDS in a public drainage authority. Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Urban Drainage, Porto Alegre, Brazil.8 p.
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    Lucey, M, Jefferies, C, Duffy, A & Buchan, D 2011, 'Assessing the risks of legacy SUDS in a public drainage authority' Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Urban Drainage, Porto Alegre, Brazil, 11/09/11 - 16/09/11, .

    Assessing the risks of legacy SUDS in a public drainage authority. / Lucey, M.; Jefferies, C.; Duffy, A.; Buchan, D.

    2011. Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Urban Drainage, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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    T1 - Assessing the risks of legacy SUDS in a public drainage authority

    AU - Lucey, M.

    AU - Jefferies, C.

    AU - Duffy, A.

    AU - Buchan, D.

    PY - 2011/9/13

    Y1 - 2011/9/13

    N2 - Scottish Water, the public drainage authority in Scotland, is required through recent legislation to take into ownership a variety of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems, (SUDS). This paper examines the route involved in establishing the transfer of ownership (termed vesting) for non-standard “legacy” SUDS installations which are those constructed prior to the publication of Scottish Water‟s design guidance in 2007 which only considers the vesting of detention ponds and basins.Scottish Water has historically had an aversion to high risk when vesting new assets. The business requires all of their drainage networks to be extremely robust and fit for purpose. As a public drainage authority, some types of SUDS give rise to much greater long term ownership, operational and maintenance concerns than others. Non-standard legacy SUDS, such as filter trenches, swales and wetlands, all cause concerns to the business since they might give problems in construction and performance and cause long-term maintenance costs, as well as posing health and safety issues.The vesting process delineates the detailed steps to be undertaken by internal and external stakeholders from the receipt of a vesting application through remedial works and on to final acceptance. Within this process the legacy SUDS are technically assessed against benchmarks depending on when they were constructed. This paper outlines the technical valisation assessment procedure used as a negotiation tool to allow Scottish Water and the developer to move forward and agree remediation measures that ensure outcomes that deliver value for money for both parties.

    AB - Scottish Water, the public drainage authority in Scotland, is required through recent legislation to take into ownership a variety of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems, (SUDS). This paper examines the route involved in establishing the transfer of ownership (termed vesting) for non-standard “legacy” SUDS installations which are those constructed prior to the publication of Scottish Water‟s design guidance in 2007 which only considers the vesting of detention ponds and basins.Scottish Water has historically had an aversion to high risk when vesting new assets. The business requires all of their drainage networks to be extremely robust and fit for purpose. As a public drainage authority, some types of SUDS give rise to much greater long term ownership, operational and maintenance concerns than others. Non-standard legacy SUDS, such as filter trenches, swales and wetlands, all cause concerns to the business since they might give problems in construction and performance and cause long-term maintenance costs, as well as posing health and safety issues.The vesting process delineates the detailed steps to be undertaken by internal and external stakeholders from the receipt of a vesting application through remedial works and on to final acceptance. Within this process the legacy SUDS are technically assessed against benchmarks depending on when they were constructed. This paper outlines the technical valisation assessment procedure used as a negotiation tool to allow Scottish Water and the developer to move forward and agree remediation measures that ensure outcomes that deliver value for money for both parties.

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    Lucey M, Jefferies C, Duffy A, Buchan D. Assessing the risks of legacy SUDS in a public drainage authority. 2011. Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Urban Drainage, Porto Alegre, Brazil.