Assessment of vitamin D concentration in non-supplemented professional athletes and healthy adults during the winter months in the UK: implications for skeletal muscle function

Graeme L. Close, J. Russell, James N. Cobley, D. J. Owens, G. Wilson, Warren Gregson, W. D. Fraser, James P. Morton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The current study implemented a two-part design to (1) assess the vitamin D concentration of a large cohort of non-vitamin D supplemented UK-based athletes and 30 age-matched healthy non-athletes and (2) to examine the effects of 5000 IU · day−1 vitamin D3 supplementation for 8-weeks on musculoskeletal performance in a placebo controlled trial. Vitamin D concentration was determined as severely deficient if serum 25(OH)D < 12.5 nmol · l−1, deficient 12.5–30 nmol · l−1 and inadequate 30–50 nmol · l−1. We demonstrate that 62% of the athletes (38/61) and 73% of the controls (22/30) exhibited serum total 25(OH)D < 50 nmol · l−1. Additionally, vitamin D supplementation increased serum total 25(OH)D from baseline (mean ± SD = 29 ± 25 to 103 ± 25 nmol · l−1P = 0.0028), whereas the placebo showed no significant change (53 ± 29 to 74 ± 24 nmol · l−1P = 0.12). There was a significant increase in 10 m sprint times (P = 0.008) and vertical-jump (P = 0.008) in the vitamin D group whereas the placebo showed no change (P = 0.587 and P = 0.204 respectively). The current data supports previous findings that athletes living at Northerly latitudes (UK = 53° N) exhibit inadequate vitamin D concentrations (<50 nmol · l−1). Additionally the data suggests that inadequate vitamin D concentration is detrimental to musculoskeletal performance in athletes. Future studies using larger athletic groups are now warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)344-353
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume31
Issue number4
Early online date22 Oct 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Vitamin D
Athletes
Skeletal Muscle
Placebos
Serum
Sports

Cite this

Close, Graeme L. ; Russell, J. ; Cobley, James N. ; Owens, D. J. ; Wilson, G. ; Gregson, Warren ; Fraser, W. D. ; Morton, James P. / Assessment of vitamin D concentration in non-supplemented professional athletes and healthy adults during the winter months in the UK : implications for skeletal muscle function. In: Journal of Sports Sciences. 2013 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 344-353.
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Assessment of vitamin D concentration in non-supplemented professional athletes and healthy adults during the winter months in the UK : implications for skeletal muscle function. / Close, Graeme L.; Russell, J.; Cobley, James N.; Owens, D. J.; Wilson, G.; Gregson, Warren; Fraser, W. D.; Morton, James P.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 4, 2013, p. 344-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The current study implemented a two-part design to (1) assess the vitamin D concentration of a large cohort of non-vitamin D supplemented UK-based athletes and 30 age-matched healthy non-athletes and (2) to examine the effects of 5000 IU · day−1 vitamin D3 supplementation for 8-weeks on musculoskeletal performance in a placebo controlled trial. Vitamin D concentration was determined as severely deficient if serum 25(OH)D < 12.5 nmol · l−1, deficient 12.5–30 nmol · l−1 and inadequate 30–50 nmol · l−1. We demonstrate that 62% of the athletes (38/61) and 73% of the controls (22/30) exhibited serum total 25(OH)D < 50 nmol · l−1. Additionally, vitamin D supplementation increased serum total 25(OH)D from baseline (mean ± SD = 29 ± 25 to 103 ± 25 nmol · l−1, P = 0.0028), whereas the placebo showed no significant change (53 ± 29 to 74 ± 24 nmol · l−1, P = 0.12). There was a significant increase in 10 m sprint times (P = 0.008) and vertical-jump (P = 0.008) in the vitamin D group whereas the placebo showed no change (P = 0.587 and P = 0.204 respectively). The current data supports previous findings that athletes living at Northerly latitudes (UK = 53° N) exhibit inadequate vitamin D concentrations (<50 nmol · l−1). Additionally the data suggests that inadequate vitamin D concentration is detrimental to musculoskeletal performance in athletes. Future studies using larger athletic groups are now warranted.

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