Automated state of play: rethinking anthropocentric rules of the game

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Automation of play has become an ever more noticeable phenomenon in the domain of video games, expressed by self-playing game worlds, self-acting characters, and non-human agents traversing multiplayer spaces. This article proposes to look at AI-driven non-human play and, what follows, rethink digital games, taking into consideration their cybernetic nature, thus departing from the anthropocentric perspectives dominating the field of Game Studies. A decentralised post-humanist reading, as the author argues, not only allows to rethink digital games and play, but is a necessary condition to critically reflect AI, which due to the fictional character of video games, often plays by very different rules than the so-called “true” AI.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalDigital Culture and Society
Volume4
Issue number1
Early online date19 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Sep 2018

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artificial intelligence
computer game
cybernetics
automation

Cite this

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abstract = "Automation of play has become an ever more noticeable phenomenon in the domain of video games, expressed by self-playing game worlds, self-acting characters, and non-human agents traversing multiplayer spaces. This article proposes to look at AI-driven non-human play and, what follows, rethink digital games, taking into consideration their cybernetic nature, thus departing from the anthropocentric perspectives dominating the field of Game Studies. A decentralised post-humanist reading, as the author argues, not only allows to rethink digital games and play, but is a necessary condition to critically reflect AI, which due to the fictional character of video games, often plays by very different rules than the so-called “true” AI.",
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Automated state of play : rethinking anthropocentric rules of the game. / Fizek, Sonia.

In: Digital Culture and Society, Vol. 4, No. 1, 19.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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