Brain matters…in social sciences

Elena Rusconi, Jemma Sedgmond, Samuela Bolgan, Christopher D. Chambers

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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Abstract

Here we offer a general introduction to cognitive neuroscience and provide examples relevant to psychology, healthcare and bioethics, law and criminology, information studies, of how brain studies have influenced, are influencing or show the potential to influence the social sciences. We argue that social scientists should read, and be enabled to understand, primary sources of evidence in cognitive neuroscience. We encourage cognitive neuroscientists to reflect upon the resonance that their work may have across the social sciences and to facilitate a mutually enriching interdisciplinary dialogue.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-263
Number of pages11
JournalAIMS Neuroscience
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Aug 2016

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Rusconi, E., Sedgmond, J., Bolgan, S., & Chambers, C. D. (2016). Brain matters…in social sciences. AIMS Neuroscience, 3(3), 253-263. https://doi.org/10.3934/Neuroscience.2016.3.253
Rusconi, Elena ; Sedgmond, Jemma ; Bolgan, Samuela ; Chambers, Christopher D. / Brain matters…in social sciences. In: AIMS Neuroscience. 2016 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 253-263.
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Rusconi, E, Sedgmond, J, Bolgan, S & Chambers, CD 2016, 'Brain matters…in social sciences', AIMS Neuroscience, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 253-263. https://doi.org/10.3934/Neuroscience.2016.3.253

Brain matters…in social sciences. / Rusconi, Elena; Sedgmond, Jemma; Bolgan, Samuela; Chambers, Christopher D.

In: AIMS Neuroscience, Vol. 3, No. 3, 16.08.2016, p. 253-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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Rusconi E, Sedgmond J, Bolgan S, Chambers CD. Brain matters…in social sciences. AIMS Neuroscience. 2016 Aug 16;3(3):253-263. https://doi.org/10.3934/Neuroscience.2016.3.253