Combining work and study: a solution?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Anyone dealing regularly with advising students is aware of the conflict between academic and non-academic pursuits, in particular paid employment, that can lead to under-performance and absence frequently followed by withdrawal from the course. Work has been perceived as conflicting with study rather than enhancing the learning experience, unless it is part of a sandwich course.

Current progression rates indicate that some of those withdrawing at first and second year are working part-time and not combining work and study effectively. In order to address this issue it was necessary to devise a structured approach that gave credit to students whilst at work that also enhanced the learning experience. To that end, the Advisor of Studies devised a module to help students structure their personal development for work and study.

The purposes of introducing the module were to:
• Improve students’ performance in examinations and coursework.
• Minimise “drop-out” rates. The design of the programme integrates the skills required for academic study with those developed as a result of employment, voluntary work or vocational training that is not otherwise recognised as a part of the course undertaken.

The module aims to counteract this cause of poor progression by acknowledging and directing the skills and knowledge attained in a non-academic environment. Students who leave with the Diploma in Higher Education and utilised this option are expected to be more likely to return to their studies at a later date.

In conjunction with the assessment strategy adopted it is envisaged that the module will, to a certain extent, address one cause of poor progression.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPROGRESS 1
Subtitle of host publicationStudent progression and retention in engineering: proceedings
EditorsG. Cutler, S. Pulko
Place of PublicationHull
PublisherUniversity of Hull
Pages166-172
Number of pages6
StatePublished - 2001
EventProgress 1 - Hull, United Kingdom

Conference

ConferenceProgress 1
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHull
Period18/10/0120/10/01

Fingerprint

work
student
employment
cause
course
learning
performance
sandwich course
studies (academic)
vocational education
withdrawal
credit
examination
conflict
purpose
assessment
structure
strategy
program
education

Cite this

Simpson, E. (2001). Combining work and study: a solution? In G. Cutler, & S. Pulko (Eds.), PROGRESS 1: Student progression and retention in engineering: proceedings (pp. 166-172). Hull: University of Hull.

Simpson, Edward / Combining work and study : a solution?

PROGRESS 1: Student progression and retention in engineering: proceedings. ed. / G. Cutler; S. Pulko. Hull : University of Hull, 2001. p. 166-172.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Simpson, E 2001, Combining work and study: a solution? in G Cutler & S Pulko (eds), PROGRESS 1: Student progression and retention in engineering: proceedings. University of Hull, Hull, pp. 166-172, Progress 1, Hull, United Kingdom, 18-20 October.

Combining work and study : a solution? / Simpson, Edward.

PROGRESS 1: Student progression and retention in engineering: proceedings. ed. / G. Cutler; S. Pulko. Hull : University of Hull, 2001. p. 166-172.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Simpson E. Combining work and study: a solution? In Cutler G, Pulko S, editors, PROGRESS 1: Student progression and retention in engineering: proceedings. Hull: University of Hull. 2001. p. 166-172.