Comparison of volatiles, phenolics, sugars, antioxidant vitamins, and sensory quality of different colored carrot varieties

Cesarettin Alasalvar*, John M. Grigor, Donglin Zhang, Peter C. Quantick, Fereidoon Shahidi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Four different colored carrots, orange, purple with orange core, yellow, and white, were examined for their content of phenolics, antioxidant vitamins, and sugars as well as their volatiles and sensory responses. A total of 35 volatiles were identified in all carrots, 27 positively. White carrot contained the highest content of volatiles, followed by orange, purple, and yellow. In total, 11, 16, 10, and 9 phenolic compounds were determined for the first time in orange, purple, yellow, and white carrots, respectively. Of these, chlorogenic acid was the most predominant phenolic compound in all carrot varieties. Differences (p < 0.05) in relative sweetness, the contents of vitamin C and α- and β-carotenes, and certain flavor characteristics were observed among the colored carrot varieties examined. Purple carrots contained 2.2 and 2.3 times more α- and β-carotenes (trace in yellow; not detected in white) than orange carrots, respectively. Purple carrot may be used in place of other carrot varieties to take advantage of its nutraceutical components.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1410-1416
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Daucus carota
Carotenoids
Vitamins
Sugars
carrots
vitamins
Antioxidants
sugars
antioxidants
Chlorogenic Acid
Flavors
Ascorbic Acid
carotenes
phenolic compounds
sweetness
chlorogenic acid
Dietary Supplements
functional foods
flavor
ascorbic acid

Cite this

Alasalvar, Cesarettin ; Grigor, John M. ; Zhang, Donglin ; Quantick, Peter C. ; Shahidi, Fereidoon. / Comparison of volatiles, phenolics, sugars, antioxidant vitamins, and sensory quality of different colored carrot varieties. In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2001 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 1410-1416.
@article{f0039bf1a57048279d02a352f0a63351,
title = "Comparison of volatiles, phenolics, sugars, antioxidant vitamins, and sensory quality of different colored carrot varieties",
abstract = "Four different colored carrots, orange, purple with orange core, yellow, and white, were examined for their content of phenolics, antioxidant vitamins, and sugars as well as their volatiles and sensory responses. A total of 35 volatiles were identified in all carrots, 27 positively. White carrot contained the highest content of volatiles, followed by orange, purple, and yellow. In total, 11, 16, 10, and 9 phenolic compounds were determined for the first time in orange, purple, yellow, and white carrots, respectively. Of these, chlorogenic acid was the most predominant phenolic compound in all carrot varieties. Differences (p < 0.05) in relative sweetness, the contents of vitamin C and α- and β-carotenes, and certain flavor characteristics were observed among the colored carrot varieties examined. Purple carrots contained 2.2 and 2.3 times more α- and β-carotenes (trace in yellow; not detected in white) than orange carrots, respectively. Purple carrot may be used in place of other carrot varieties to take advantage of its nutraceutical components.",
author = "Cesarettin Alasalvar and Grigor, {John M.} and Donglin Zhang and Quantick, {Peter C.} and Fereidoon Shahidi",
year = "2001",
month = "10",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1021/jf000595h",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "1410--1416",
journal = "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry",
issn = "0021-8561",
publisher = "AMER CHEMICAL SOC",
number = "3",

}

Comparison of volatiles, phenolics, sugars, antioxidant vitamins, and sensory quality of different colored carrot varieties. / Alasalvar, Cesarettin; Grigor, John M.; Zhang, Donglin; Quantick, Peter C.; Shahidi, Fereidoon.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 49, No. 3, 02.10.2001, p. 1410-1416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of volatiles, phenolics, sugars, antioxidant vitamins, and sensory quality of different colored carrot varieties

AU - Alasalvar, Cesarettin

AU - Grigor, John M.

AU - Zhang, Donglin

AU - Quantick, Peter C.

AU - Shahidi, Fereidoon

PY - 2001/10/2

Y1 - 2001/10/2

N2 - Four different colored carrots, orange, purple with orange core, yellow, and white, were examined for their content of phenolics, antioxidant vitamins, and sugars as well as their volatiles and sensory responses. A total of 35 volatiles were identified in all carrots, 27 positively. White carrot contained the highest content of volatiles, followed by orange, purple, and yellow. In total, 11, 16, 10, and 9 phenolic compounds were determined for the first time in orange, purple, yellow, and white carrots, respectively. Of these, chlorogenic acid was the most predominant phenolic compound in all carrot varieties. Differences (p < 0.05) in relative sweetness, the contents of vitamin C and α- and β-carotenes, and certain flavor characteristics were observed among the colored carrot varieties examined. Purple carrots contained 2.2 and 2.3 times more α- and β-carotenes (trace in yellow; not detected in white) than orange carrots, respectively. Purple carrot may be used in place of other carrot varieties to take advantage of its nutraceutical components.

AB - Four different colored carrots, orange, purple with orange core, yellow, and white, were examined for their content of phenolics, antioxidant vitamins, and sugars as well as their volatiles and sensory responses. A total of 35 volatiles were identified in all carrots, 27 positively. White carrot contained the highest content of volatiles, followed by orange, purple, and yellow. In total, 11, 16, 10, and 9 phenolic compounds were determined for the first time in orange, purple, yellow, and white carrots, respectively. Of these, chlorogenic acid was the most predominant phenolic compound in all carrot varieties. Differences (p < 0.05) in relative sweetness, the contents of vitamin C and α- and β-carotenes, and certain flavor characteristics were observed among the colored carrot varieties examined. Purple carrots contained 2.2 and 2.3 times more α- and β-carotenes (trace in yellow; not detected in white) than orange carrots, respectively. Purple carrot may be used in place of other carrot varieties to take advantage of its nutraceutical components.

U2 - 10.1021/jf000595h

DO - 10.1021/jf000595h

M3 - Article

C2 - 11312873

AN - SCOPUS:0034831413

VL - 49

SP - 1410

EP - 1416

JO - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

JF - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

SN - 0021-8561

IS - 3

ER -