Conceptual influences on word order and voice in sentence production: evidence from Japanese

Mikihiro N. Tanaka, Holly P. Branigan, Janet F. McLean, Martin J. Pickering

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments using a sentence recall task tested the effect of animacy on syntactic processing in Japanese sentence production. Experiment 1 and 2 showed that when Japanese native speakers recalled transitive sentences, they were more likely to assign animate entities earlier positions in the sentence than inanimate entities. In addition, Experiment 2 showed that they were more likely to recall animate entities than inanimate entities as sentence subjects in active and passive sentences. Thus conceptual information influenced both the way in which grammatical functions were assigned and choice of word order. We consider the implications of these findings for theories of language production.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)318-330
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume65
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jun 2011

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Population Groups
Language
experiment
evidence
Experiments
Syntactics
Processing
language
Entity
Sentence Production
Experiment
Animate

Cite this

Tanaka, Mikihiro N. ; Branigan, Holly P. ; McLean, Janet F. ; Pickering, Martin J. / Conceptual influences on word order and voice in sentence production: evidence from Japanese. In: Journal of Memory and Language. 2011 ; Vol. 65, No. 3. pp. 318-330.
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Conceptual influences on word order and voice in sentence production: evidence from Japanese. / Tanaka, Mikihiro N.; Branigan, Holly P.; McLean, Janet F.; Pickering, Martin J.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 65, No. 3, 03.06.2011, p. 318-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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