Counter-conditioning as an Intervention to modify anti-fat attitudes

Stuart W Flint, Joanne Hudson, David Lavallee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the effect of anti-fat attitude counter-conditioning using positive images of obese individuals participants completed implicit and explicit measures of attitudes towards fatness on three occasions: no intervention; following exposure to positive images of obese members of the general public; and to images of obese celebrities. Contrary to expectations, positive images of obese individuals did not result in more positive attitudes towards fatness as expected and, in some cases, indices of these attitudes worsened. Results suggest that attitudes towards obesity and fatness may be somewhat robust and resistant to change, possibly suggesting a central and not peripheral processing route for their formation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere24
Pages (from-to)122-125
Number of pages4
JournalHealth psychology research
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Fats
Obesity
Conditioning (Psychology)

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Flint, Stuart W ; Hudson, Joanne ; Lavallee, David. / Counter-conditioning as an Intervention to modify anti-fat attitudes. In: Health psychology research. 2013 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 122-125.
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Counter-conditioning as an Intervention to modify anti-fat attitudes. / Flint, Stuart W; Hudson, Joanne; Lavallee, David.

In: Health psychology research, Vol. 1, No. 2, e24, 18.04.2013, p. 122-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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