Creatine supplementation has no effect on human muscle protein turnover at rest in the postabsorptive or fed states

Magali Louis, Jacques R. Poortmans, Marc Francaux, Eric Hultman, Jacques Berré, Nathalie Boisseau, Vernon R. Young, Kenneth Smith, Wolfram Meier-Augenstein, John A. Babraj, Tom Waddell, Michael J. Rennie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dietary creatine supplementation is associated with increases in muscle mass, but the mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that creatine supplementation enhanced myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and diminished muscle protein breakdown (MPB) in the fed state. Six healthy men (26 ± 7 yr, body mass index 22 ± 4 kg/m2) were studied twice, 2-4 wk apart, before and after ingestion of creatine (21 g/day, 5 days). We carried out two sets of measurements within 5.5 h of both MPS (by incorporation of [1-13C]leucine in quadriceps muscle) and MPB (as dilution of [1-13C]leucine or [2H5]phenylalanine across the forearm); for the first 3 h, the subjects were postabsorptive but thereafter were fed orally (0.3 g maltodextrin and 0.083 g protein. kg body wt-1 x h-1). Creatine supplementation increased muscle total creatine by approximately 30% (P < 0.01). Feeding had significant effects, doubling MPS (P < 0.001) and depressing MPB by approximately 40% (P < 0.026), but creatine had no effect on turnover in the postabsorptive or fed states. Thus any increase in muscle mass accompanying creatine supplementation must be associated with increased physical activity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E764-E770
Number of pages7
JournalAJP Endocrinology & Metabolism
Volume284
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Creatine
Muscle Proteins
Leucine
Muscles
Proteins
Quadriceps Muscle
Dietary Supplements
Phenylalanine
Forearm
Body Mass Index
Eating
Exercise

Cite this

Louis, M., Poortmans, J. R., Francaux, M., Hultman, E., Berré, J., Boisseau, N., ... Rennie, M. J. (2003). Creatine supplementation has no effect on human muscle protein turnover at rest in the postabsorptive or fed states. AJP Endocrinology & Metabolism, 284(4), E764-E770. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpendo.00338.2002
Louis, Magali ; Poortmans, Jacques R. ; Francaux, Marc ; Hultman, Eric ; Berré, Jacques ; Boisseau, Nathalie ; Young, Vernon R. ; Smith, Kenneth ; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram ; Babraj, John A. ; Waddell, Tom ; Rennie, Michael J. / Creatine supplementation has no effect on human muscle protein turnover at rest in the postabsorptive or fed states. In: AJP Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2003 ; Vol. 284, No. 4. pp. E764-E770.
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abstract = "Dietary creatine supplementation is associated with increases in muscle mass, but the mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that creatine supplementation enhanced myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and diminished muscle protein breakdown (MPB) in the fed state. Six healthy men (26 ± 7 yr, body mass index 22 ± 4 kg/m2) were studied twice, 2-4 wk apart, before and after ingestion of creatine (21 g/day, 5 days). We carried out two sets of measurements within 5.5 h of both MPS (by incorporation of [1-13C]leucine in quadriceps muscle) and MPB (as dilution of [1-13C]leucine or [2H5]phenylalanine across the forearm); for the first 3 h, the subjects were postabsorptive but thereafter were fed orally (0.3 g maltodextrin and 0.083 g protein. kg body wt-1 x h-1). Creatine supplementation increased muscle total creatine by approximately 30{\%} (P < 0.01). Feeding had significant effects, doubling MPS (P < 0.001) and depressing MPB by approximately 40{\%} (P < 0.026), but creatine had no effect on turnover in the postabsorptive or fed states. Thus any increase in muscle mass accompanying creatine supplementation must be associated with increased physical activity.",
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Louis, M, Poortmans, JR, Francaux, M, Hultman, E, Berré, J, Boisseau, N, Young, VR, Smith, K, Meier-Augenstein, W, Babraj, JA, Waddell, T & Rennie, MJ 2003, 'Creatine supplementation has no effect on human muscle protein turnover at rest in the postabsorptive or fed states', AJP Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol. 284, no. 4, pp. E764-E770. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpendo.00338.2002

Creatine supplementation has no effect on human muscle protein turnover at rest in the postabsorptive or fed states. / Louis, Magali; Poortmans, Jacques R.; Francaux, Marc; Hultman, Eric ; Berré, Jacques; Boisseau, Nathalie; Young, Vernon R.; Smith, Kenneth; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Babraj, John A.; Waddell, Tom; Rennie, Michael J.

In: AJP Endocrinology & Metabolism, Vol. 284, No. 4, 04.2003, p. E764-E770.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Creatine supplementation has no effect on human muscle protein turnover at rest in the postabsorptive or fed states

AU - Louis, Magali

AU - Poortmans, Jacques R.

AU - Francaux, Marc

AU - Hultman, Eric

AU - Berré, Jacques

AU - Boisseau, Nathalie

AU - Young, Vernon R.

AU - Smith, Kenneth

AU - Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram

AU - Babraj, John A.

AU - Waddell, Tom

AU - Rennie, Michael J.

PY - 2003/4

Y1 - 2003/4

N2 - Dietary creatine supplementation is associated with increases in muscle mass, but the mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that creatine supplementation enhanced myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and diminished muscle protein breakdown (MPB) in the fed state. Six healthy men (26 ± 7 yr, body mass index 22 ± 4 kg/m2) were studied twice, 2-4 wk apart, before and after ingestion of creatine (21 g/day, 5 days). We carried out two sets of measurements within 5.5 h of both MPS (by incorporation of [1-13C]leucine in quadriceps muscle) and MPB (as dilution of [1-13C]leucine or [2H5]phenylalanine across the forearm); for the first 3 h, the subjects were postabsorptive but thereafter were fed orally (0.3 g maltodextrin and 0.083 g protein. kg body wt-1 x h-1). Creatine supplementation increased muscle total creatine by approximately 30% (P < 0.01). Feeding had significant effects, doubling MPS (P < 0.001) and depressing MPB by approximately 40% (P < 0.026), but creatine had no effect on turnover in the postabsorptive or fed states. Thus any increase in muscle mass accompanying creatine supplementation must be associated with increased physical activity.

AB - Dietary creatine supplementation is associated with increases in muscle mass, but the mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that creatine supplementation enhanced myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and diminished muscle protein breakdown (MPB) in the fed state. Six healthy men (26 ± 7 yr, body mass index 22 ± 4 kg/m2) were studied twice, 2-4 wk apart, before and after ingestion of creatine (21 g/day, 5 days). We carried out two sets of measurements within 5.5 h of both MPS (by incorporation of [1-13C]leucine in quadriceps muscle) and MPB (as dilution of [1-13C]leucine or [2H5]phenylalanine across the forearm); for the first 3 h, the subjects were postabsorptive but thereafter were fed orally (0.3 g maltodextrin and 0.083 g protein. kg body wt-1 x h-1). Creatine supplementation increased muscle total creatine by approximately 30% (P < 0.01). Feeding had significant effects, doubling MPS (P < 0.001) and depressing MPB by approximately 40% (P < 0.026), but creatine had no effect on turnover in the postabsorptive or fed states. Thus any increase in muscle mass accompanying creatine supplementation must be associated with increased physical activity.

U2 - 10.1152/ajpendo.00338.2002

DO - 10.1152/ajpendo.00338.2002

M3 - Article

VL - 284

SP - E764-E770

JO - AJP Endocrinology & Metabolism

JF - AJP Endocrinology & Metabolism

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ER -