Developing communication and organization skills: the ELITE life skills reflective practice intervention

Martin Ian Jones*, David Lavallee, David Tod

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to evaluate the ELITE intervention as a method of increasing the perceived use of communication and organization skills in young people. The participants were three male field hockey players and two female tennis players from a British university. We used a series of single subject, multiple baselines, with minimal meaningful harm and benefit criteria and SMDall effect sizes to evaluate the ELITE intervention. The results revealed no meaningful harm from participating in the program, and the tennis players showed meaningful benefits. SMDall effect sizes all demonstrated that the intervention had a positive effect. Post intervention interviews indicated that participants valued the targeted life skills, and the program was enjoyable. Implications of this study suggest that scholars and practitioners can use the ELITE intervention to increase life skills in young people.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-176
Number of pages18
JournalSport Psychologist
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2011

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Developing communication and organization skills : the ELITE life skills reflective practice intervention. / Jones, Martin Ian; Lavallee, David; Tod, David.

In: Sport Psychologist, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.06.2011, p. 159-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Developing communication and organization skills

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AU - Jones, Martin Ian

AU - Lavallee, David

AU - Tod, David

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AB - The aim of the current study was to evaluate the ELITE intervention as a method of increasing the perceived use of communication and organization skills in young people. The participants were three male field hockey players and two female tennis players from a British university. We used a series of single subject, multiple baselines, with minimal meaningful harm and benefit criteria and SMDall effect sizes to evaluate the ELITE intervention. The results revealed no meaningful harm from participating in the program, and the tennis players showed meaningful benefits. SMDall effect sizes all demonstrated that the intervention had a positive effect. Post intervention interviews indicated that participants valued the targeted life skills, and the program was enjoyable. Implications of this study suggest that scholars and practitioners can use the ELITE intervention to increase life skills in young people.

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