Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants

Ben W. Kolosz, Mark A. Goddard, Ehsan M. Jorat, Saran P. Sohi, David A. C. Manning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Recent research into soil engineering indicates that increased carbon sequestration through the conversion of atmospheric CO2 to a pedogenic carbonate mineral (calcite, CaCO3) may help mitigate global warming through artificially engineering a variety of soils with selected materials and vegetation so that they have a photosynthesis-driven carbon capture function. Non-biological processes of carbonation also occur, at high pH. In both cases, CO2 partitions into soil porewaters as dissolved carbonate, and precipitates by combining with Ca derived from portlandite (Ca(OH)2) and weathered cement-derived calcium silicates, derived from materials generated by the demolition process. This paper aims to illustrate a method for capturing lifecycle data by quantifying the stocks and flows of the process through a series of possible experiments which if proved successful will allow a deeper understanding of the
ability of soil calcite to act as a stable CO2 sink. The challenge is to identify noncalcined (i.e. calcium silicate) rocks, that weather sufficiently rapidly to provide a net sink for CO2, taking into account all emissions during production. The results will lead to normalised impact assessment data which can be applied globally within the fields of soil science and civil engineering. Furthermore, if the results indicate a strong uptake in terms of CO2 sequestration there is the potential to assist the United Kingdom’s 80% CO2 reduction target by 2050 through widespread adoption of the technology, provided that there is a positive cost-benefit ratio.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment 2015, Kobe, Japan
Subtitle of host publicationofficial conference proceedings
Place of PublicationNagoya
PublisherInternational Academic Forum (IAFOR)
Pages93-112
Number of pages20
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event5th Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment: Power & Sustainability - Art Center of Kobe, Kobe, Japan
Duration: 11 Jun 201514 Jun 2015
Conference number: 5

Publication series

Name
PublisherInternational Academic Forum (IAFOR)
ISSN (Print)2186-2311

Conference

Conference5th Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment
Abbreviated titleACSEE2015
CountryJapan
CityKobe
Period11/06/1514/06/15

Fingerprint

carbon sequestration
calcite
soil
silicate
calcium
carbonate
engineering
demolition
civil engineering
soil science
global warming
porewater
photosynthesis
cement
weather
index
vegetation
carbon
mineral
rock

Cite this

Kolosz, B. W., Goddard, M. A., Jorat, E. M., Sohi, S. P., & Manning, D. A. C. (2015). Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants. In The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment 2015, Kobe, Japan: official conference proceedings (pp. 93-112). [10513] Nagoya: International Academic Forum (IAFOR).
Kolosz, Ben W. ; Goddard, Mark A. ; Jorat, Ehsan M. ; Sohi, Saran P. ; Manning, David A. C. / Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants. The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment 2015, Kobe, Japan: official conference proceedings. Nagoya : International Academic Forum (IAFOR), 2015. pp. 93-112
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title = "Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants",
abstract = "Recent research into soil engineering indicates that increased carbon sequestration through the conversion of atmospheric CO2 to a pedogenic carbonate mineral (calcite, CaCO3) may help mitigate global warming through artificially engineering a variety of soils with selected materials and vegetation so that they have a photosynthesis-driven carbon capture function. Non-biological processes of carbonation also occur, at high pH. In both cases, CO2 partitions into soil porewaters as dissolved carbonate, and precipitates by combining with Ca derived from portlandite (Ca(OH)2) and weathered cement-derived calcium silicates, derived from materials generated by the demolition process. This paper aims to illustrate a method for capturing lifecycle data by quantifying the stocks and flows of the process through a series of possible experiments which if proved successful will allow a deeper understanding of theability of soil calcite to act as a stable CO2 sink. The challenge is to identify noncalcined (i.e. calcium silicate) rocks, that weather sufficiently rapidly to provide a net sink for CO2, taking into account all emissions during production. The results will lead to normalised impact assessment data which can be applied globally within the fields of soil science and civil engineering. Furthermore, if the results indicate a strong uptake in terms of CO2 sequestration there is the potential to assist the United Kingdom’s 80{\%} CO2 reduction target by 2050 through widespread adoption of the technology, provided that there is a positive cost-benefit ratio.",
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Kolosz, BW, Goddard, MA, Jorat, EM, Sohi, SP & Manning, DAC 2015, Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants. in The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment 2015, Kobe, Japan: official conference proceedings., 10513, International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Nagoya, pp. 93-112, 5th Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment, Kobe, Japan, 11/06/15.

Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants. / Kolosz, Ben W.; Goddard, Mark A.; Jorat, Ehsan M.; Sohi, Saran P.; Manning, David A. C.

The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment 2015, Kobe, Japan: official conference proceedings. Nagoya : International Academic Forum (IAFOR), 2015. p. 93-112 10513.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants

AU - Kolosz, Ben W.

AU - Goddard, Mark A.

AU - Jorat, Ehsan M.

AU - Sohi, Saran P.

AU - Manning, David A. C.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Recent research into soil engineering indicates that increased carbon sequestration through the conversion of atmospheric CO2 to a pedogenic carbonate mineral (calcite, CaCO3) may help mitigate global warming through artificially engineering a variety of soils with selected materials and vegetation so that they have a photosynthesis-driven carbon capture function. Non-biological processes of carbonation also occur, at high pH. In both cases, CO2 partitions into soil porewaters as dissolved carbonate, and precipitates by combining with Ca derived from portlandite (Ca(OH)2) and weathered cement-derived calcium silicates, derived from materials generated by the demolition process. This paper aims to illustrate a method for capturing lifecycle data by quantifying the stocks and flows of the process through a series of possible experiments which if proved successful will allow a deeper understanding of theability of soil calcite to act as a stable CO2 sink. The challenge is to identify noncalcined (i.e. calcium silicate) rocks, that weather sufficiently rapidly to provide a net sink for CO2, taking into account all emissions during production. The results will lead to normalised impact assessment data which can be applied globally within the fields of soil science and civil engineering. Furthermore, if the results indicate a strong uptake in terms of CO2 sequestration there is the potential to assist the United Kingdom’s 80% CO2 reduction target by 2050 through widespread adoption of the technology, provided that there is a positive cost-benefit ratio.

AB - Recent research into soil engineering indicates that increased carbon sequestration through the conversion of atmospheric CO2 to a pedogenic carbonate mineral (calcite, CaCO3) may help mitigate global warming through artificially engineering a variety of soils with selected materials and vegetation so that they have a photosynthesis-driven carbon capture function. Non-biological processes of carbonation also occur, at high pH. In both cases, CO2 partitions into soil porewaters as dissolved carbonate, and precipitates by combining with Ca derived from portlandite (Ca(OH)2) and weathered cement-derived calcium silicates, derived from materials generated by the demolition process. This paper aims to illustrate a method for capturing lifecycle data by quantifying the stocks and flows of the process through a series of possible experiments which if proved successful will allow a deeper understanding of theability of soil calcite to act as a stable CO2 sink. The challenge is to identify noncalcined (i.e. calcium silicate) rocks, that weather sufficiently rapidly to provide a net sink for CO2, taking into account all emissions during production. The results will lead to normalised impact assessment data which can be applied globally within the fields of soil science and civil engineering. Furthermore, if the results indicate a strong uptake in terms of CO2 sequestration there is the potential to assist the United Kingdom’s 80% CO2 reduction target by 2050 through widespread adoption of the technology, provided that there is a positive cost-benefit ratio.

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 93

EP - 112

BT - The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment 2015, Kobe, Japan

PB - International Academic Forum (IAFOR)

CY - Nagoya

ER -

Kolosz BW, Goddard MA, Jorat EM, Sohi SP, Manning DAC. Developing lifecycle inventory indices for estimating the carbon sequestration of artificially engineered soils and plants. In The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy and the Environment 2015, Kobe, Japan: official conference proceedings. Nagoya: International Academic Forum (IAFOR). 2015. p. 93-112. 10513