Empirical evidence of spatial thresholds to control invasion of fungal parasites and saprotrophs

Wilfred Otten, Douglas J. Bailey, Christopher A. Gilligan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The ability to forecast invasion of harmful and beneficial organisms is becoming increasingly important in agricultural and horticultural production systems as well as in natural plant communities. • In this paper we examine the spread of a fungus through a population of discrete sites on a lattice, using replicable, yet stochastically variable experimental microcosms. • We combine epidemiological concepts to summarise fungal growth dynamics with percolation theory to derive and test the following hypotheses: first fungal invasion into a population of susceptible sites on a lattice can be stopped by a threshold proportion of randomly removed sites; second random removal of susceptible sites from a population introduces a shield which can prevent invasion of unprotected sites; and third the rate at which a susceptible population is invaded reduces with increasing number of randomly protected sites. • The broader consequences of thresholds for fungal invasion in natural and agricultural systems are discussed briefly.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-132
Number of pages8
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume163
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

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at-risk population
Parasites
beneficial organisms
microbial growth
plant communities
production technology
parasites
fungi
testing
saprotrophs
Fungi

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Otten, Wilfred; Bailey, Douglas J.; Gilligan, Christopher A. / Empirical evidence of spatial thresholds to control invasion of fungal parasites and saprotrophs.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 163, No. 1, 2004, p. 125-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Empirical evidence of spatial thresholds to control invasion of fungal parasites and saprotrophs. / Otten, Wilfred; Bailey, Douglas J.; Gilligan, Christopher A.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 163, No. 1, 2004, p. 125-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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