Encapsulation of citrus by-product extracts by spray-drying and freeze-drying using combinations of maltodextrin with soybean protein and ι-carrageenan

Konstantinos Papoutsis, John B. Golding, Quan Vuong, Penta Pristijono, Costas E. Stathopoulos, Christopher J. Scarlett, Michael Bowyer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    The effect of different combinations of maltodextrin (MD) coating agents (MD, MD + soybean protein, and MD + ι-carrageenan) on the encapsulation of lemon by-product aqueous extracts using freeze-drying and spray-drying were investigated. The total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of the microparticles were evaluated. Freeze-drying with the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the highest retention of TPC, TFC, and FRAP (1.66 ± 0.02 mg GAE/g d.b., 0.43 ± 0.02 mg CE/g d.b., and 3.70 ± 0.05 mM TE/g, respectively). Freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with lower moisture content (MC) and water activity (aw) than those produced by spray-drying. Specifically, the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by freeze-drying ranged from 1.15 to 2.15% and 0.13 to 0.14, respectively, while the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by spray-drying ranged from 6.06% to 6.60% and 0.33 to 0.40, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that spray-drying resulted in the formation of spherical particles of different sizes regardless of the type of coating agent. Although freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with amorphous glassy shapes, the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the formation of spherical porous particles. X-ray diffraction revealed a low degree of crystallinity for the samples produced by both techniques.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number115
    Number of pages12
    JournalFoods
    Volume7
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 19 Jul 2018

    Fingerprint

    Soybean Proteins
    Freeze Drying
    Citrus
    Carrageenan
    Flavonoids
    Antioxidants
    Ions
    Particle Size
    X-Ray Diffraction
    Electron Scanning Microscopy
    maltodextrin
    Water

    Cite this

    Papoutsis, K., Golding, J. B., Vuong, Q., Pristijono, P., Stathopoulos, C. E., Scarlett, C. J., & Bowyer, M. (2018). Encapsulation of citrus by-product extracts by spray-drying and freeze-drying using combinations of maltodextrin with soybean protein and ι-carrageenan. Foods, 7(7), [115]. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7070115
    Papoutsis, Konstantinos ; Golding, John B. ; Vuong, Quan ; Pristijono, Penta ; Stathopoulos, Costas E. ; Scarlett, Christopher J. ; Bowyer, Michael. / Encapsulation of citrus by-product extracts by spray-drying and freeze-drying using combinations of maltodextrin with soybean protein and ι-carrageenan. In: Foods. 2018 ; Vol. 7, No. 7.
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    title = "Encapsulation of citrus by-product extracts by spray-drying and freeze-drying using combinations of maltodextrin with soybean protein and ι-carrageenan",
    abstract = "The effect of different combinations of maltodextrin (MD) coating agents (MD, MD + soybean protein, and MD + ι-carrageenan) on the encapsulation of lemon by-product aqueous extracts using freeze-drying and spray-drying were investigated. The total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of the microparticles were evaluated. Freeze-drying with the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the highest retention of TPC, TFC, and FRAP (1.66 ± 0.02 mg GAE/g d.b., 0.43 ± 0.02 mg CE/g d.b., and 3.70 ± 0.05 mM TE/g, respectively). Freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with lower moisture content (MC) and water activity (aw) than those produced by spray-drying. Specifically, the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by freeze-drying ranged from 1.15 to 2.15{\%} and 0.13 to 0.14, respectively, while the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by spray-drying ranged from 6.06{\%} to 6.60{\%} and 0.33 to 0.40, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that spray-drying resulted in the formation of spherical particles of different sizes regardless of the type of coating agent. Although freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with amorphous glassy shapes, the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the formation of spherical porous particles. X-ray diffraction revealed a low degree of crystallinity for the samples produced by both techniques.",
    author = "Konstantinos Papoutsis and Golding, {John B.} and Quan Vuong and Penta Pristijono and Stathopoulos, {Costas E.} and Scarlett, {Christopher J.} and Michael Bowyer",
    year = "2018",
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    Encapsulation of citrus by-product extracts by spray-drying and freeze-drying using combinations of maltodextrin with soybean protein and ι-carrageenan. / Papoutsis, Konstantinos; Golding, John B.; Vuong, Quan; Pristijono, Penta; Stathopoulos, Costas E.; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Bowyer, Michael.

    In: Foods, Vol. 7, No. 7, 115, 19.07.2018.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Encapsulation of citrus by-product extracts by spray-drying and freeze-drying using combinations of maltodextrin with soybean protein and ι-carrageenan

    AU - Papoutsis, Konstantinos

    AU - Golding, John B.

    AU - Vuong, Quan

    AU - Pristijono, Penta

    AU - Stathopoulos, Costas E.

    AU - Scarlett, Christopher J.

    AU - Bowyer, Michael

    PY - 2018/7/19

    Y1 - 2018/7/19

    N2 - The effect of different combinations of maltodextrin (MD) coating agents (MD, MD + soybean protein, and MD + ι-carrageenan) on the encapsulation of lemon by-product aqueous extracts using freeze-drying and spray-drying were investigated. The total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of the microparticles were evaluated. Freeze-drying with the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the highest retention of TPC, TFC, and FRAP (1.66 ± 0.02 mg GAE/g d.b., 0.43 ± 0.02 mg CE/g d.b., and 3.70 ± 0.05 mM TE/g, respectively). Freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with lower moisture content (MC) and water activity (aw) than those produced by spray-drying. Specifically, the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by freeze-drying ranged from 1.15 to 2.15% and 0.13 to 0.14, respectively, while the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by spray-drying ranged from 6.06% to 6.60% and 0.33 to 0.40, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that spray-drying resulted in the formation of spherical particles of different sizes regardless of the type of coating agent. Although freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with amorphous glassy shapes, the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the formation of spherical porous particles. X-ray diffraction revealed a low degree of crystallinity for the samples produced by both techniques.

    AB - The effect of different combinations of maltodextrin (MD) coating agents (MD, MD + soybean protein, and MD + ι-carrageenan) on the encapsulation of lemon by-product aqueous extracts using freeze-drying and spray-drying were investigated. The total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of the microparticles were evaluated. Freeze-drying with the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the highest retention of TPC, TFC, and FRAP (1.66 ± 0.02 mg GAE/g d.b., 0.43 ± 0.02 mg CE/g d.b., and 3.70 ± 0.05 mM TE/g, respectively). Freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with lower moisture content (MC) and water activity (aw) than those produced by spray-drying. Specifically, the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by freeze-drying ranged from 1.15 to 2.15% and 0.13 to 0.14, respectively, while the MC and aw of the microparticles produced by spray-drying ranged from 6.06% to 6.60% and 0.33 to 0.40, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that spray-drying resulted in the formation of spherical particles of different sizes regardless of the type of coating agent. Although freeze-drying resulted in microparticles with amorphous glassy shapes, the mixture of MD + soybean protein resulted in the formation of spherical porous particles. X-ray diffraction revealed a low degree of crystallinity for the samples produced by both techniques.

    U2 - 10.3390/foods7070115

    DO - 10.3390/foods7070115

    M3 - Article

    VL - 7

    JO - Foods

    JF - Foods

    SN - 2304-8158

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