Enhancing children's event recall after long delays

David J. La Rooy, Margaret-Ellen Pipe, Janice E. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The effects of context reinstatement as means of enhancing 5- and 6-year-old children's event memory in repeated interviews after a 6-month delay were examined. Children were interviewed immediately after the event (baseline interview) and twice at a 6-month delay, with 24 hours between interviews. The first 6-month interview was conducted in a perfect-context reinstatement (n = 15), imperfect-context reinstatement (n = 16), or no-context reinstatement (n = 15) condition. The second 6-month interview was conducted 24 hours later with no-context reinstatement for all children. Context reinstatement attenuated the effects of delay on recall. The accuracy of the details reported was greater in the perfect-context compared to the imperfect-context and no-context conditions. Details repeated between the immediate-baseline interview and in the first 6-month interview were more accurate than details repeated between the first and second 6-month interview. There was no increase in recall (hypermnesia) across the first and second 6-month interviews in any condition. Practical implications of these findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

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La Rooy, D. J., Pipe, M-E., & Murray, J. E. (2007). Enhancing children's event recall after long delays. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 21(1), 1-17. DOI: 10.1002/acp.1272

La Rooy, David J.; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Murray, Janice E. / Enhancing children's event recall after long delays.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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La Rooy, DJ, Pipe, M-E & Murray, JE 2007, 'Enhancing children's event recall after long delays' Applied Cognitive Psychology, vol 21, no. 1, pp. 1-17. DOI: 10.1002/acp.1272

Enhancing children's event recall after long delays. / La Rooy, David J.; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Murray, Janice E.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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La Rooy DJ, Pipe M-E, Murray JE. Enhancing children's event recall after long delays. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 2007 Jan;21(1):1-17. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/acp.1272