Forensic science education

the past and the present in and out of the classroom

John P. Cassella, Peter D. Maskell, Anna Williams

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

    Abstract

    This chapter aims to reflect upon and to consider the ‘where are we now’ aspect of forensic science education and training. Despite the rhythms and reflective cycle that academia requires, it is surprising how little time the on-the-ground academics and practitioners involved in education and training get to truly reflect upon the curriculum and assessment of what they deliver. Of course what is specifically taught depends upon many variables; the interests, skills and experiences of those academics delivering the material coupled with the requirement of the industry to teach it. Whilst such criteria are of importance to say ‘art’ colleagues in their curriculum design, they are not as crucial as they are to a subject such as forensic science. This offers limited latitude for what is taught and requires industry professionals and accreditation boards to drive the expectations of the curricula to a greater degree. What is apparent over the
    coming pages is the change and the rate of change that has taken place in the forensic science profession at all levels, technical, practical and academic and its use within the Courtrooms is now greater than ever, demanding higher and higher levels of skill, competence and understanding of what is useful in a police investigation and criminal trial.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationForensic science education and training
    Subtitle of host publicationa tool-kit for lecturers and practitioner trainers
    EditorsAnna Williams, John P. Cassella, Peter D. Maskell
    Place of PublicationChichester
    PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons
    Pages1-18
    Number of pages18
    ISBN (Electronic)9781118689196
    ISBN (Print)9781118689233
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2017

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    curriculum
    classroom
    science
    education
    industry
    accreditation
    police
    profession
    art
    experience
    time

    Cite this

    Cassella, J. P., Maskell, P. D., & Williams, A. (2017). Forensic science education: the past and the present in and out of the classroom. In A. Williams, J. P. Cassella, & P. D. Maskell (Eds.), Forensic science education and training : a tool-kit for lecturers and practitioner trainers (pp. 1-18). Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118689196.ch1
    Cassella, John P. ; Maskell, Peter D. ; Williams, Anna. / Forensic science education : the past and the present in and out of the classroom. Forensic science education and training : a tool-kit for lecturers and practitioner trainers. editor / Anna Williams ; John P. Cassella ; Peter D. Maskell. Chichester : John Wiley & Sons, 2017. pp. 1-18
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    abstract = "This chapter aims to reflect upon and to consider the ‘where are we now’ aspect of forensic science education and training. Despite the rhythms and reflective cycle that academia requires, it is surprising how little time the on-the-ground academics and practitioners involved in education and training get to truly reflect upon the curriculum and assessment of what they deliver. Of course what is specifically taught depends upon many variables; the interests, skills and experiences of those academics delivering the material coupled with the requirement of the industry to teach it. Whilst such criteria are of importance to say ‘art’ colleagues in their curriculum design, they are not as crucial as they are to a subject such as forensic science. This offers limited latitude for what is taught and requires industry professionals and accreditation boards to drive the expectations of the curricula to a greater degree. What is apparent over thecoming pages is the change and the rate of change that has taken place in the forensic science profession at all levels, technical, practical and academic and its use within the Courtrooms is now greater than ever, demanding higher and higher levels of skill, competence and understanding of what is useful in a police investigation and criminal trial.",
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    Cassella, JP, Maskell, PD & Williams, A 2017, Forensic science education: the past and the present in and out of the classroom. in A Williams, JP Cassella & PD Maskell (eds), Forensic science education and training : a tool-kit for lecturers and practitioner trainers. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118689196.ch1

    Forensic science education : the past and the present in and out of the classroom. / Cassella, John P.; Maskell, Peter D.; Williams, Anna.

    Forensic science education and training : a tool-kit for lecturers and practitioner trainers. ed. / Anna Williams; John P. Cassella; Peter D. Maskell. Chichester : John Wiley & Sons, 2017. p. 1-18.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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    AB - This chapter aims to reflect upon and to consider the ‘where are we now’ aspect of forensic science education and training. Despite the rhythms and reflective cycle that academia requires, it is surprising how little time the on-the-ground academics and practitioners involved in education and training get to truly reflect upon the curriculum and assessment of what they deliver. Of course what is specifically taught depends upon many variables; the interests, skills and experiences of those academics delivering the material coupled with the requirement of the industry to teach it. Whilst such criteria are of importance to say ‘art’ colleagues in their curriculum design, they are not as crucial as they are to a subject such as forensic science. This offers limited latitude for what is taught and requires industry professionals and accreditation boards to drive the expectations of the curricula to a greater degree. What is apparent over thecoming pages is the change and the rate of change that has taken place in the forensic science profession at all levels, technical, practical and academic and its use within the Courtrooms is now greater than ever, demanding higher and higher levels of skill, competence and understanding of what is useful in a police investigation and criminal trial.

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    Cassella JP, Maskell PD, Williams A. Forensic science education: the past and the present in and out of the classroom. In Williams A, Cassella JP, Maskell PD, editors, Forensic science education and training : a tool-kit for lecturers and practitioner trainers. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. 2017. p. 1-18 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118689196.ch1