Gender differences and digital learning games: one size does not fit all

Joseph Osunde, Elisabeth Kabler, Lachlan M. MacKinnon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The intrinsic motivation demonstrated towards digital games provides the opportunity for its use as a learning tool irrespective of gender differences. This has resulted in the combination of the motivation of games with curricular content referred to as Digital Game-Based Learning.While some related studies have argued that there are no gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational games, others present an opposing view.This paper reports the result of an investigation into the motivational appeal of digital educational games for 11-14 years old girls and boys. There is evidence that this age group is pivotal to the shrinking pipeline phenomenon in which fewer females progressively engage with computer science education and careers.The investigation involved a two stage study composed of a qualitative exploratory study, which identified the key criteria for the successful appeal of some digital entertainment games to young girls and boys and a main study. The main study generate both qualitative and quantitative data to further investigate the motivational appeal of digital educational games for learning basic computer science concepts for both girls and boys of age 11-14 years old. For the main study, two experimental games for learning basic computer science concepts were created based on the key criteria identified from the exploratory study.The first included the game characteristics that appeared to support the motivational appeal of the girls. The second game was antithetical to the first. Both genders from the participating population engaged with both games and online questionnaires were used to capture data on their perception of both games.The outcome of the investigation which involved 304 participants (girls = 152 and boys =152) from Southeast England, United Kingdom provided the empirical evidence in support of the argument that there are gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational game characteristics which can either support or thwart motivation i.e. one size does not fit all.The result of this investigation should support educationists, researchers and digital educational game designers in having an inclusive approach towards the creation of digital educational games for learning.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018)
EditorsAna Azevedo, Anabela Mesquita
PublisherCurran Associates Inc
Pages271-277
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781510861879
Publication statusPublished - May 2018
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018) - Porto, Portugal
Duration: 12 Apr 201813 Apr 2018

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018)
Abbreviated titleICGR 2018
CountryPortugal
CityPorto
Period12/04/1813/04/18

Fingerprint

gender-specific factors
appeal
computer science
learning
data capture
intrinsic motivation
entertainment
evidence
age group
career
questionnaire
gender
education

Cite this

Osunde, J., Kabler, E., & MacKinnon, L. M. (2018). Gender differences and digital learning games: one size does not fit all. In A. Azevedo, & A. Mesquita (Eds.), International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018) (pp. 271-277). Curran Associates Inc.
Osunde, Joseph ; Kabler, Elisabeth ; MacKinnon, Lachlan M. / Gender differences and digital learning games : one size does not fit all. International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018). editor / Ana Azevedo ; Anabela Mesquita. Curran Associates Inc, 2018. pp. 271-277
@inproceedings{959cc5a20fab4fada5b4cb03c717e5e2,
title = "Gender differences and digital learning games: one size does not fit all",
abstract = "The intrinsic motivation demonstrated towards digital games provides the opportunity for its use as a learning tool irrespective of gender differences. This has resulted in the combination of the motivation of games with curricular content referred to as Digital Game-Based Learning.While some related studies have argued that there are no gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational games, others present an opposing view.This paper reports the result of an investigation into the motivational appeal of digital educational games for 11-14 years old girls and boys. There is evidence that this age group is pivotal to the shrinking pipeline phenomenon in which fewer females progressively engage with computer science education and careers.The investigation involved a two stage study composed of a qualitative exploratory study, which identified the key criteria for the successful appeal of some digital entertainment games to young girls and boys and a main study. The main study generate both qualitative and quantitative data to further investigate the motivational appeal of digital educational games for learning basic computer science concepts for both girls and boys of age 11-14 years old. For the main study, two experimental games for learning basic computer science concepts were created based on the key criteria identified from the exploratory study.The first included the game characteristics that appeared to support the motivational appeal of the girls. The second game was antithetical to the first. Both genders from the participating population engaged with both games and online questionnaires were used to capture data on their perception of both games.The outcome of the investigation which involved 304 participants (girls = 152 and boys =152) from Southeast England, United Kingdom provided the empirical evidence in support of the argument that there are gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational game characteristics which can either support or thwart motivation i.e. one size does not fit all.The result of this investigation should support educationists, researchers and digital educational game designers in having an inclusive approach towards the creation of digital educational games for learning.",
author = "Joseph Osunde and Elisabeth Kabler and MacKinnon, {Lachlan M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781510861879",
pages = "271--277",
editor = "Ana Azevedo and Anabela Mesquita",
booktitle = "International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018)",
publisher = "Curran Associates Inc",

}

Osunde, J, Kabler, E & MacKinnon, LM 2018, Gender differences and digital learning games: one size does not fit all. in A Azevedo & A Mesquita (eds), International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018). Curran Associates Inc, pp. 271-277, International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018), Porto, Portugal, 12/04/18.

Gender differences and digital learning games : one size does not fit all. / Osunde, Joseph; Kabler, Elisabeth; MacKinnon, Lachlan M.

International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018). ed. / Ana Azevedo; Anabela Mesquita. Curran Associates Inc, 2018. p. 271-277.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Gender differences and digital learning games

T2 - one size does not fit all

AU - Osunde, Joseph

AU - Kabler, Elisabeth

AU - MacKinnon, Lachlan M.

PY - 2018/5

Y1 - 2018/5

N2 - The intrinsic motivation demonstrated towards digital games provides the opportunity for its use as a learning tool irrespective of gender differences. This has resulted in the combination of the motivation of games with curricular content referred to as Digital Game-Based Learning.While some related studies have argued that there are no gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational games, others present an opposing view.This paper reports the result of an investigation into the motivational appeal of digital educational games for 11-14 years old girls and boys. There is evidence that this age group is pivotal to the shrinking pipeline phenomenon in which fewer females progressively engage with computer science education and careers.The investigation involved a two stage study composed of a qualitative exploratory study, which identified the key criteria for the successful appeal of some digital entertainment games to young girls and boys and a main study. The main study generate both qualitative and quantitative data to further investigate the motivational appeal of digital educational games for learning basic computer science concepts for both girls and boys of age 11-14 years old. For the main study, two experimental games for learning basic computer science concepts were created based on the key criteria identified from the exploratory study.The first included the game characteristics that appeared to support the motivational appeal of the girls. The second game was antithetical to the first. Both genders from the participating population engaged with both games and online questionnaires were used to capture data on their perception of both games.The outcome of the investigation which involved 304 participants (girls = 152 and boys =152) from Southeast England, United Kingdom provided the empirical evidence in support of the argument that there are gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational game characteristics which can either support or thwart motivation i.e. one size does not fit all.The result of this investigation should support educationists, researchers and digital educational game designers in having an inclusive approach towards the creation of digital educational games for learning.

AB - The intrinsic motivation demonstrated towards digital games provides the opportunity for its use as a learning tool irrespective of gender differences. This has resulted in the combination of the motivation of games with curricular content referred to as Digital Game-Based Learning.While some related studies have argued that there are no gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational games, others present an opposing view.This paper reports the result of an investigation into the motivational appeal of digital educational games for 11-14 years old girls and boys. There is evidence that this age group is pivotal to the shrinking pipeline phenomenon in which fewer females progressively engage with computer science education and careers.The investigation involved a two stage study composed of a qualitative exploratory study, which identified the key criteria for the successful appeal of some digital entertainment games to young girls and boys and a main study. The main study generate both qualitative and quantitative data to further investigate the motivational appeal of digital educational games for learning basic computer science concepts for both girls and boys of age 11-14 years old. For the main study, two experimental games for learning basic computer science concepts were created based on the key criteria identified from the exploratory study.The first included the game characteristics that appeared to support the motivational appeal of the girls. The second game was antithetical to the first. Both genders from the participating population engaged with both games and online questionnaires were used to capture data on their perception of both games.The outcome of the investigation which involved 304 participants (girls = 152 and boys =152) from Southeast England, United Kingdom provided the empirical evidence in support of the argument that there are gender differences in the motivational appeal of digital educational game characteristics which can either support or thwart motivation i.e. one size does not fit all.The result of this investigation should support educationists, researchers and digital educational game designers in having an inclusive approach towards the creation of digital educational games for learning.

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781510861879

SP - 271

EP - 277

BT - International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018)

A2 - Azevedo, Ana

A2 - Mesquita, Anabela

PB - Curran Associates Inc

ER -

Osunde J, Kabler E, MacKinnon LM. Gender differences and digital learning games: one size does not fit all. In Azevedo A, Mesquita A, editors, International Conference on Gender Research (ICGR 2018). Curran Associates Inc. 2018. p. 271-277