'God was with me in a wonderful manner': the Puritan origins of the Indian captivity narrative

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Abstract

This paper argues that the origins of the Indian captivity narrative should be understood in the historical contexts of its production in the New World as a narrative that is at once descriptive of the personal experiences of frontier captives of the seventeenth century, and is symbolic too of the Puritan errand of separation, settlement and eventual conquest of the land.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Studies Today Online
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Deity
Historical Context
Descriptive
Conquest
Personal Experience
Captive

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abstract = "This paper argues that the origins of the Indian captivity narrative should be understood in the historical contexts of its production in the New World as a narrative that is at once descriptive of the personal experiences of frontier captives of the seventeenth century, and is symbolic too of the Puritan errand of separation, settlement and eventual conquest of the land.",
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