‘Guys! Stop doing it!’: young women's adoption and rejection of safety advice when socializing in bars, pubs and clubs

Oona Brooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)
167 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Concern about the increase in alcohol consumption amongst young women, drink spiking and drug-assisted sexual assault have culminated in a renewed focus on safety advice for young women. This paper examines young women's responses to safety advice, and their associated safety behaviours, by drawing upon interview and focus group data from a qualitative study with 35 young women (18–25 years) in relation to their safety in bars, pubs and clubs. The findings reveal that young women's behaviours were complex and contradictory in that they resisted, adopted and transgressed recommended safety behaviours. This raises interesting questions about both the practical and the theoretical implications of contemporary safety campaigns, challenging the prevailing focus on women's behaviour and the gendered discourse invoked by such campaigns.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)635-651
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Criminology
Volume51
Issue number4
Early online date28 Mar 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

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clubs
Safety
campaign
assault
Focus Groups
alcohol consumption
Alcohol Drinking
Rejection (Psychology)
Pubs
Clubs
Rejection
Interviews
drug
discourse
interview
Pharmaceutical Preparations
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Cite this

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‘Guys! Stop doing it!’ : young women's adoption and rejection of safety advice when socializing in bars, pubs and clubs. / Brooks, Oona.

In: British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 51, No. 4, 01.07.2011, p. 635-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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