High intensity training improves health and physical function in middle aged adults

Simon Adamson, Ross Lorimer, James N. Cobley, Ray Lloyd, John A. Babraj

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

16 Citations (Scopus)
15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

High intensity training (HIT) is effective at improving health; however, it is unknown whether HIT also improves physical function. This study aimed to determine whether HIT improves metabolic health and physical function in untrained middle aged individuals. Fourteen (three male and eleven female) untrained individuals were recruited (control group n = 6: age 42 ± 8 y, weight 64 ± 10 kg, BMI 24 ± 2 kg·m−2 or HIT group n = 8: age 43 ± 8 y, weight 80 ± 8 kg, BMI 29 ± 5 kg·m−2). Training was performed twice weekly, consisting of 10 × 6-second sprints with a one minute recovery between each sprint. Metabolic health (oral glucose tolerance test), aerobic capacity (incremental time to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer) and physical function (get up and go test, sit to stand test and loaded 50 m walk) were determined before and after training. Following eight weeks of HIT there was a significant improvement in aerobic capacity (8% increase in VO2 peak; p < 0.001), physical function (11%–27% respectively; p < 0.05) and a reduction in blood glucose area under the curve (6% reduction; p < 0.05). This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of HIT as a training intervention to improve skeletal muscle function and glucose clearance as we age.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)333-344
Number of pages122
JournalBiology
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 May 2014

Fingerprint

middle-aged adults
Health
Weights and Measures
Glucose Tolerance Test
blood glucose
Area Under Curve
skeletal muscle
Blood Glucose
Skeletal Muscle
Glucose
Exercise equipment
testing
Control Groups
glucose
Muscle
Recovery

Cite this

Adamson, Simon ; Lorimer, Ross ; Cobley, James N. ; Lloyd, Ray ; Babraj, John A. / High intensity training improves health and physical function in middle aged adults. In: Biology. 2014 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 333-344.
@article{a846acb69e7c4f24be02eb640993ead3,
title = "High intensity training improves health and physical function in middle aged adults",
abstract = "High intensity training (HIT) is effective at improving health; however, it is unknown whether HIT also improves physical function. This study aimed to determine whether HIT improves metabolic health and physical function in untrained middle aged individuals. Fourteen (three male and eleven female) untrained individuals were recruited (control group n = 6: age 42 ± 8 y, weight 64 ± 10 kg, BMI 24 ± 2 kg·m−2 or HIT group n = 8: age 43 ± 8 y, weight 80 ± 8 kg, BMI 29 ± 5 kg·m−2). Training was performed twice weekly, consisting of 10 × 6-second sprints with a one minute recovery between each sprint. Metabolic health (oral glucose tolerance test), aerobic capacity (incremental time to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer) and physical function (get up and go test, sit to stand test and loaded 50 m walk) were determined before and after training. Following eight weeks of HIT there was a significant improvement in aerobic capacity (8{\%} increase in VO2 peak; p < 0.001), physical function (11{\%}–27{\%} respectively; p < 0.05) and a reduction in blood glucose area under the curve (6{\%} reduction; p < 0.05). This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of HIT as a training intervention to improve skeletal muscle function and glucose clearance as we age.",
author = "Simon Adamson and Ross Lorimer and Cobley, {James N.} and Ray Lloyd and Babraj, {John A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "5",
day = "12",
doi = "10.3390/biology3020333",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "333--344",
journal = "Biology",
issn = "2079-7737",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "2",

}

High intensity training improves health and physical function in middle aged adults. / Adamson, Simon; Lorimer, Ross; Cobley, James N.; Lloyd, Ray; Babraj, John A.

In: Biology, Vol. 3, No. 2, 12.05.2014, p. 333-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

TY - JOUR

T1 - High intensity training improves health and physical function in middle aged adults

AU - Adamson, Simon

AU - Lorimer, Ross

AU - Cobley, James N.

AU - Lloyd, Ray

AU - Babraj, John A.

PY - 2014/5/12

Y1 - 2014/5/12

N2 - High intensity training (HIT) is effective at improving health; however, it is unknown whether HIT also improves physical function. This study aimed to determine whether HIT improves metabolic health and physical function in untrained middle aged individuals. Fourteen (three male and eleven female) untrained individuals were recruited (control group n = 6: age 42 ± 8 y, weight 64 ± 10 kg, BMI 24 ± 2 kg·m−2 or HIT group n = 8: age 43 ± 8 y, weight 80 ± 8 kg, BMI 29 ± 5 kg·m−2). Training was performed twice weekly, consisting of 10 × 6-second sprints with a one minute recovery between each sprint. Metabolic health (oral glucose tolerance test), aerobic capacity (incremental time to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer) and physical function (get up and go test, sit to stand test and loaded 50 m walk) were determined before and after training. Following eight weeks of HIT there was a significant improvement in aerobic capacity (8% increase in VO2 peak; p < 0.001), physical function (11%–27% respectively; p < 0.05) and a reduction in blood glucose area under the curve (6% reduction; p < 0.05). This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of HIT as a training intervention to improve skeletal muscle function and glucose clearance as we age.

AB - High intensity training (HIT) is effective at improving health; however, it is unknown whether HIT also improves physical function. This study aimed to determine whether HIT improves metabolic health and physical function in untrained middle aged individuals. Fourteen (three male and eleven female) untrained individuals were recruited (control group n = 6: age 42 ± 8 y, weight 64 ± 10 kg, BMI 24 ± 2 kg·m−2 or HIT group n = 8: age 43 ± 8 y, weight 80 ± 8 kg, BMI 29 ± 5 kg·m−2). Training was performed twice weekly, consisting of 10 × 6-second sprints with a one minute recovery between each sprint. Metabolic health (oral glucose tolerance test), aerobic capacity (incremental time to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer) and physical function (get up and go test, sit to stand test and loaded 50 m walk) were determined before and after training. Following eight weeks of HIT there was a significant improvement in aerobic capacity (8% increase in VO2 peak; p < 0.001), physical function (11%–27% respectively; p < 0.05) and a reduction in blood glucose area under the curve (6% reduction; p < 0.05). This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of HIT as a training intervention to improve skeletal muscle function and glucose clearance as we age.

U2 - 10.3390/biology3020333

DO - 10.3390/biology3020333

M3 - Special issue

VL - 3

SP - 333

EP - 344

JO - Biology

JF - Biology

SN - 2079-7737

IS - 2

ER -