Holding your hand on the danger button: observing user phish detection strategies across mobile and desktop

Matt Dixon, James Nicholson, Dawn Branley-Bell, Pam Briggs, Lynne Coventry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Phishing emails continue to be a major cause of cybersecurity breaches despite the development of technical measures designed to thwart these attacks. Most phishing studies have investigated desktop email platforms, but the use of mobile devices for email exchanges has soared in recent years, especially amongst young adults. In this paper, we explore how the digital platform (desktop vs. mobile) influences users' phish detection strategies. Twenty-one young adults (18-25 years) were asked to rate the legitimacy of emails using a live inbox test while using a think-aloud protocol on both platforms. Our results suggest that a lack of knowledge about key defence information on the mobile platform results in weak phish detection. We discuss the implications of these findings and offer design recommendations to support effective phish detection by smartphone users.
Original languageEnglish
Article number195
Number of pages22
JournalProceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction
Volume6
Issue numberMHCI
Early online date20 Sep 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Sep 2022
Externally publishedYes
EventThe ACM International Conference on Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: 28 Sep 20221 Oct 2022
https://mobilehci.acm.org/2022/

Keywords

  • Phishing
  • Smartphones
  • Younger users

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