Host plant recognition by the root feeding clover weevil, Sitona lepidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

Scott N. Johnson, Peter J. Gregory, Philip J. Murray, Xiaoxian Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study investigated the ability of neonatal larvae of the root-feeding weevil, Sitona lepidus Gyllenhal, to locate white clover Trifolium repens L. (Fabaceae) roots growing in soil and to distinguish them from the roots of other species of clover and a co-occurring grass species. Choice experiments used a combination of invasive techniques and the novel technique of high resolution X-ray microtomography to non-invasively track larval movement in the soil towards plant roots. Burrowing distances towards roots of different plant species were also examined. Newly hatched S. lepidus recognized T. repens roots and moved preferentially towards them when given a choice of roots of subterranean clover, Trifolium subterraneum L. (Fabaceae), strawberry clover Trifolium fragiferum L. (Fabaceae), or perennial ryegrass Lolium perenneL. (Poaceae). Larvae recognized T. repens roots, whether released in groups of five or singly, when released 25 mm (meso-scale recognition) or 60 mm (macro-scale recognition) away from plant roots. There was no statistically significant difference in movement rates of larvae.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-439
Number of pages7
JournalBulletin of Entomological Research
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Trifolium repens
Weevils
Trifolium
Medicago
Plant Roots
Beetles
Sitona lepidus
Curculionidae
Fabaceae
larvae
Larva
Trifolium fragiferum
Trifolium subterraneum
methodology
Lolium
Poaceae
Soil
micro-computed tomography
soil movement
burrowing

Cite this

Johnson, Scott N.; Gregory, Peter J.; Murray, Philip J.; Zhang, Xiaoxian / Host plant recognition by the root feeding clover weevil, Sitona lepidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

In: Bulletin of Entomological Research, Vol. 94, No. 5, 10.2004, p. 433-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Host plant recognition by the root feeding clover weevil, Sitona lepidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)",
abstract = "This study investigated the ability of neonatal larvae of the root-feeding weevil, Sitona lepidus Gyllenhal, to locate white clover Trifolium repens L. (Fabaceae) roots growing in soil and to distinguish them from the roots of other species of clover and a co-occurring grass species. Choice experiments used a combination of invasive techniques and the novel technique of high resolution X-ray microtomography to non-invasively track larval movement in the soil towards plant roots. Burrowing distances towards roots of different plant species were also examined. Newly hatched S. lepidus recognized T. repens roots and moved preferentially towards them when given a choice of roots of subterranean clover, Trifolium subterraneum L. (Fabaceae), strawberry clover Trifolium fragiferum L. (Fabaceae), or perennial ryegrass Lolium perenneL. (Poaceae). Larvae recognized T. repens roots, whether released in groups of five or singly, when released 25 mm (meso-scale recognition) or 60 mm (macro-scale recognition) away from plant roots. There was no statistically significant difference in movement rates of larvae.",
author = "Johnson, {Scott N.} and Gregory, {Peter J.} and Murray, {Philip J.} and Xiaoxian Zhang",
year = "2004",
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journal = "Bulletin of Entomological Research",
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Host plant recognition by the root feeding clover weevil, Sitona lepidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). / Johnson, Scott N.; Gregory, Peter J.; Murray, Philip J.; Zhang, Xiaoxian.

In: Bulletin of Entomological Research, Vol. 94, No. 5, 10.2004, p. 433-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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