How embarrassing is that? Purchasing sensitive products and the potential for self-service

Andrea Szymkowiak, Li-Chuan Chiang, Jocelyn Sie, Wei Eng Koh, Paola Loubli, Graham Johnson

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

Consumers might feel uncomfortable or embarrassed when buying products that are inconsistent with the desire to project a positive self-image to others [3], [5], [7], [16]. Embarrassment and shame are key elements in the relationship between sales assistant and consumer [7] and may affect the likelihood of engagement with a service provider [10]. We explored the circumstances under which embarrassing retail experiences occur, with a view to identify the potential for self-service solutions to alleviate these experiences.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2014
EventCrafting user experience of self-service technologies: Key challenges and potential solutions
 - Morris J Wosk Centre, Vancouver, Canada
Duration: 22 Jun 201422 Jun 2014

Workshop

WorkshopCrafting user experience of self-service technologies: Key challenges and potential solutions

CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period22/06/1422/06/14
OtherProliferation of self-service technologies is a hallmark of the modern society. Increasingly often our interaction with service-providing people, such as sales assistants, cashiers, bank tellers, hotel receptionists, and so forth, is replaced by interaction with various service-providing technologies: from simple devices to complex configurations of technological artifacts. While self-service technologies have far-reaching, and not yet properly understood, implications for individuals and society, ample evidence suggests that interaction with self-service technologies can be confusing and frustrating, especially for certain categories of users. Therefore, there is a need for more focused and systematic interaction design explorations into self-service technologies.

This one-day workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners interested in analysis, design, and evaluation of self-service technologies to collectively identify key issues and explore potential approaches in this increasingly important sub-area of interaction design.

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Cite this

Szymkowiak, A., Chiang, L-C., Sie, J., Koh, W. E., Loubli, P., & Johnson, G. (2014). How embarrassing is that? Purchasing sensitive products and the potential for self-service. Paper presented at Crafting user experience of self-service technologies: Key challenges and potential solutions
, Vancouver, Canada.