In Alain Gibb's footsteps

evaluating alternative approaches to sustainable enterprise education (SEE)

Rita G. Klapper, Vanina A. Farber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the impact of contrasting pedagogies of sustainable enterprise education, focussing on the intention to create a social enterprise, as well as related entrepreneurial behaviours, values, competences and outcomes. The empirical context involves Peruvian MBA students, a corporate social responsibility curriculum and the undertaking of self-initiated social enterprise projects by students. Developing and applying a pre- and post-course survey underpinned by a multi-perspectival theoretical approach that particularly draws on Alain Gibb's theory of entrepreneurial behaviours, values, competencies and outcomes, we compare experiential learning to traditional lecture and case-based learning. We were, in particular, interested in those students who changed their mind about becoming an entrepreneur after they had participated in the experiential learning component of the course. A probit model was used to establish which factors were involved in explaining potential changes in students' attitudes. We show that students involved in the experiential learning experience increased in entrepreneurial attitudes and intention, at least in the short run. Demographic and attitudinal constructs are shown to be moderators. Our findings have implications for entrepreneurship and social enterprise teaching, particularly regarding the design and implementation of training involving high-engagement, de-routinised interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-439
Number of pages18
JournalThe International Journal of Management Education
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Experiential learning
Social enterprise
Education
Entrepreneurial behavior
Corporate Social Responsibility
Entrepreneurs
Probit model
Student attitudes
Competency
Factors
Moderator
Short-run
Demographics
Entrepreneurship
Curriculum

Cite this

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In Alain Gibb's footsteps : evaluating alternative approaches to sustainable enterprise education (SEE). / Klapper, Rita G.; Farber, Vanina A.

In: The International Journal of Management Education, Vol. 14, No. 3, 20.10.2016, p. 422-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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