In-between belongings: impact of Covid-19 pandemic on the lives of Syrian refugees in Scotland

Alex Law, Fawad Khaleel, Alija Avdukic, Ahmed Abdullah, Michelle Young

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

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Abstract

This event explores the co-existence of multiple and radically distinctive rhythmic worlds of Syrian refugees resettling in Scotland during the pandemic. The event is based on the findings of a research project that applies rhythmanalysis as a bio-social perspective that goes beyond the legal, ideological and material category of ‘refugee’, during the pandemic that placed refugees at a radical disjuncture from their historically-formed habitus of the society of emigration.

Participants were asked to visually document and audially reflect on their spatial and extra-spatial encounters of everyday life. The data re-presents the suturing of a fractured habitus and broken rhythms of everyday life during the pandemic. The realities of lockdown and the social experiences post-Covid resulted in a continuous cycle of formation, deformation, reformation of everyday rhythms in the daily lives of Syrian Refugees. An overarching theme of ‘emptiness’ emerged of a (temporarily) frozen time and space suffused with nostalgia for what once was and paralysis of what now is – a longing for belonging and home, as well as hopeful constructions of place-making in the society of immigration.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages24
Publication statusPublished - 3 Oct 2023
EventIn-between Belongings: Impact of Covid-19 pandemic on the Lives of Syrian Refugees in Scotland - Al-Maktoum College, Dundee, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Oct 20233 Oct 2023
https://blogs.napier.ac.uk/tbs/2023/09/01/in-between-belongings-impact-of-covid-19-pandemic-on-the-lives-of-syrian-refugees-in-scotland/

Conference

ConferenceIn-between Belongings
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityDundee
Period3/10/233/10/23
Internet address

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