Individual differences in women's perceptions of other women's dominance

Christopher D. Watkins, Michelle C. Quist, Finlay G. Smith, Lisa M. DeBruine, Benedict C. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research on men's dominance perception suggests that the extent to which men perceive masculine men to be more dominant than relatively feminine men is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance. In the current studies, we investigated the relationship between indices of women's own dominance and their perceptions of other women's facial dominance. Women's own height and scores on a dominance questionnaire were negatively correlated with the extent to which they perceived masculine women to be more dominant than relatively feminine women. In follow-up studies, we observed similar individual differences when (i) women separately judged other women's social and physical dominance, suggesting that individual differences in women's dominance perceptions generalize across two different types of dominance judgment and (ii) we assessed the perceivers' dominance indirectly by using a questionnaire that measures the extent to which women view interactions with other women in competitive terms. These findings present new evidence that the extent to which people perceive masculine individuals to be more dominant than relatively feminine individuals is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance and suggest that competition and conflict among women may have shaped individual differences in women's dominance perception.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to) 79–86
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Personality
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Individuality
Social Dominance

Cite this

Watkins, Christopher D. ; Quist, Michelle C. ; Smith, Finlay G. ; DeBruine, Lisa M. ; Jones, Benedict C. / Individual differences in women's perceptions of other women's dominance. In: European Journal of Personality. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 79–86.
@article{3db5fc00de044b49ac43cffdf26b809b,
title = "Individual differences in women's perceptions of other women's dominance",
abstract = "Recent research on men's dominance perception suggests that the extent to which men perceive masculine men to be more dominant than relatively feminine men is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance. In the current studies, we investigated the relationship between indices of women's own dominance and their perceptions of other women's facial dominance. Women's own height and scores on a dominance questionnaire were negatively correlated with the extent to which they perceived masculine women to be more dominant than relatively feminine women. In follow-up studies, we observed similar individual differences when (i) women separately judged other women's social and physical dominance, suggesting that individual differences in women's dominance perceptions generalize across two different types of dominance judgment and (ii) we assessed the perceivers' dominance indirectly by using a questionnaire that measures the extent to which women view interactions with other women in competitive terms. These findings present new evidence that the extent to which people perceive masculine individuals to be more dominant than relatively feminine individuals is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance and suggest that competition and conflict among women may have shaped individual differences in women's dominance perception.",
author = "Watkins, {Christopher D.} and Quist, {Michelle C.} and Smith, {Finlay G.} and DeBruine, {Lisa M.} and Jones, {Benedict C.}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1002/per.837",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "79–86",
journal = "European Journal of Personality",
issn = "0890-2070",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Individual differences in women's perceptions of other women's dominance. / Watkins, Christopher D.; Quist, Michelle C.; Smith, Finlay G.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.

In: European Journal of Personality, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2012, p. 79–86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Individual differences in women's perceptions of other women's dominance

AU - Watkins, Christopher D.

AU - Quist, Michelle C.

AU - Smith, Finlay G.

AU - DeBruine, Lisa M.

AU - Jones, Benedict C.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Recent research on men's dominance perception suggests that the extent to which men perceive masculine men to be more dominant than relatively feminine men is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance. In the current studies, we investigated the relationship between indices of women's own dominance and their perceptions of other women's facial dominance. Women's own height and scores on a dominance questionnaire were negatively correlated with the extent to which they perceived masculine women to be more dominant than relatively feminine women. In follow-up studies, we observed similar individual differences when (i) women separately judged other women's social and physical dominance, suggesting that individual differences in women's dominance perceptions generalize across two different types of dominance judgment and (ii) we assessed the perceivers' dominance indirectly by using a questionnaire that measures the extent to which women view interactions with other women in competitive terms. These findings present new evidence that the extent to which people perceive masculine individuals to be more dominant than relatively feminine individuals is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance and suggest that competition and conflict among women may have shaped individual differences in women's dominance perception.

AB - Recent research on men's dominance perception suggests that the extent to which men perceive masculine men to be more dominant than relatively feminine men is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance. In the current studies, we investigated the relationship between indices of women's own dominance and their perceptions of other women's facial dominance. Women's own height and scores on a dominance questionnaire were negatively correlated with the extent to which they perceived masculine women to be more dominant than relatively feminine women. In follow-up studies, we observed similar individual differences when (i) women separately judged other women's social and physical dominance, suggesting that individual differences in women's dominance perceptions generalize across two different types of dominance judgment and (ii) we assessed the perceivers' dominance indirectly by using a questionnaire that measures the extent to which women view interactions with other women in competitive terms. These findings present new evidence that the extent to which people perceive masculine individuals to be more dominant than relatively feminine individuals is negatively correlated with measures of their own dominance and suggest that competition and conflict among women may have shaped individual differences in women's dominance perception.

U2 - 10.1002/per.837

DO - 10.1002/per.837

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 79

EP - 86

JO - European Journal of Personality

JF - European Journal of Personality

SN - 0890-2070

IS - 1

ER -