Influences of lateral preference and personality on behaviour towards a manual sorting task

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Abstract

Differences in task behaviour between left- and right-handers and left- and right-eared individuals have been reported (e.g. Jackson, 2008 and Wright et al., 2004) with left-handers taking longer to begin a task and right-eared individuals having a more disinhibited approach. Personality measurements are also important when examining approach behaviour. Jackson (2008) reported that those with higher neuroticism levels and a right-ear preference react faster to tasks. The current study investigated the effects of lateral preference and personality on behaviour towards a manual sorting task. Eighty-five participants completed laterality and personality scales and a card-sorting task. Degree of hand preference was found to influence behaviour towards the task with strong left-handers taking longer to begin. Those with a left congruent lateral preference (left-hand, left-ear) took significantly longer to begin the task than those with a right congruent preference. Neither neuroticism nor extraversion influenced task approach. We concluded that hand preference, and more specifically a strong left-hand preference is a good predictor of a longer initiation time on a manual task. Ear preference on its own does not predict initiation time.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)903-907
Number of pages5
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume54
Issue number8
Early online date16 Feb 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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Personality
Hand
Ear
Choice Behavior
Neuroticism

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title = "Influences of lateral preference and personality on behaviour towards a manual sorting task",
abstract = "Differences in task behaviour between left- and right-handers and left- and right-eared individuals have been reported (e.g. Jackson, 2008 and Wright et al., 2004) with left-handers taking longer to begin a task and right-eared individuals having a more disinhibited approach. Personality measurements are also important when examining approach behaviour. Jackson (2008) reported that those with higher neuroticism levels and a right-ear preference react faster to tasks. The current study investigated the effects of lateral preference and personality on behaviour towards a manual sorting task. Eighty-five participants completed laterality and personality scales and a card-sorting task. Degree of hand preference was found to influence behaviour towards the task with strong left-handers taking longer to begin. Those with a left congruent lateral preference (left-hand, left-ear) took significantly longer to begin the task than those with a right congruent preference. Neither neuroticism nor extraversion influenced task approach. We concluded that hand preference, and more specifically a strong left-hand preference is a good predictor of a longer initiation time on a manual task. Ear preference on its own does not predict initiation time.",
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Influences of lateral preference and personality on behaviour towards a manual sorting task. / Wright, Lynn; Watt, Susan; Hardie, Scott M.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 54, No. 8, 06.2013, p. 903-907.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Differences in task behaviour between left- and right-handers and left- and right-eared individuals have been reported (e.g. Jackson, 2008 and Wright et al., 2004) with left-handers taking longer to begin a task and right-eared individuals having a more disinhibited approach. Personality measurements are also important when examining approach behaviour. Jackson (2008) reported that those with higher neuroticism levels and a right-ear preference react faster to tasks. The current study investigated the effects of lateral preference and personality on behaviour towards a manual sorting task. Eighty-five participants completed laterality and personality scales and a card-sorting task. Degree of hand preference was found to influence behaviour towards the task with strong left-handers taking longer to begin. Those with a left congruent lateral preference (left-hand, left-ear) took significantly longer to begin the task than those with a right congruent preference. Neither neuroticism nor extraversion influenced task approach. We concluded that hand preference, and more specifically a strong left-hand preference is a good predictor of a longer initiation time on a manual task. Ear preference on its own does not predict initiation time.

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