Initial experimental evidence that the ability to choose between items alters attraction to familiar versus novel persons in different ways for men and women

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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Abstract

Nonhuman species may respond to novel mates with increased sexual motivation (‘The Coolidge Effect1). In humans, novel technological advances, such as online dating platforms, are thought to result in ‘Choice Overload’2. This may undermine the goal of finding a meaningful relationship3, orienting the user toward novel possible partners versus committing to a partner. Here, we used a paradigm measuring change in attraction to familiar faces (i.e. rated on second viewing4) to investigate Coolidge-like phenomena in humans primed with choice of potential online dating partners. We examined two pre-registered hypotheses (https://osf.io/xs74r/files/). First, whether experimentally priming choice (viewing a slideshow of online dating images) directly reduces the attractiveness of familiar preferred sex faces compared to our control condition. Second, whether the predicted effect is stronger for men than women given the role of the Coolidge effect in male sexual motivation5.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 9 Feb 2019
EventSociety for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference - Oregon Convention Center, Portland, United States
Duration: 7 Feb 20199 Feb 2019
http://meeting.spsp.org/

Conference

ConferenceSociety for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference
Abbreviated titleSPSP Convention
CountryUnited States
CityPortland
Period7/02/199/02/19
Internet address

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Motivation

Cite this

Sculley, J., Watkins, C. D., & Ritchie, K. L. (2019). Initial experimental evidence that the ability to choose between items alters attraction to familiar versus novel persons in different ways for men and women. Poster session presented at Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference , Portland, United States.
Sculley, Jordan ; Watkins, Christopher D. ; Ritchie, Kay L. / Initial experimental evidence that the ability to choose between items alters attraction to familiar versus novel persons in different ways for men and women. Poster session presented at Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference , Portland, United States.
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abstract = "Nonhuman species may respond to novel mates with increased sexual motivation (‘The Coolidge Effect1). In humans, novel technological advances, such as online dating platforms, are thought to result in ‘Choice Overload’2. This may undermine the goal of finding a meaningful relationship3, orienting the user toward novel possible partners versus committing to a partner. Here, we used a paradigm measuring change in attraction to familiar faces (i.e. rated on second viewing4) to investigate Coolidge-like phenomena in humans primed with choice of potential online dating partners. We examined two pre-registered hypotheses (https://osf.io/xs74r/files/). First, whether experimentally priming choice (viewing a slideshow of online dating images) directly reduces the attractiveness of familiar preferred sex faces compared to our control condition. Second, whether the predicted effect is stronger for men than women given the role of the Coolidge effect in male sexual motivation5.",
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year = "2019",
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day = "9",
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Sculley, J, Watkins, CD & Ritchie, KL 2019, 'Initial experimental evidence that the ability to choose between items alters attraction to familiar versus novel persons in different ways for men and women' Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference , Portland, United States, 7/02/19 - 9/02/19, .

Initial experimental evidence that the ability to choose between items alters attraction to familiar versus novel persons in different ways for men and women. / Sculley, Jordan; Watkins, Christopher D.; Ritchie, Kay L.

2019. Poster session presented at Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference , Portland, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Initial experimental evidence that the ability to choose between items alters attraction to familiar versus novel persons in different ways for men and women

AU - Sculley, Jordan

AU - Watkins, Christopher D.

AU - Ritchie, Kay L.

PY - 2019/2/9

Y1 - 2019/2/9

N2 - Nonhuman species may respond to novel mates with increased sexual motivation (‘The Coolidge Effect1). In humans, novel technological advances, such as online dating platforms, are thought to result in ‘Choice Overload’2. This may undermine the goal of finding a meaningful relationship3, orienting the user toward novel possible partners versus committing to a partner. Here, we used a paradigm measuring change in attraction to familiar faces (i.e. rated on second viewing4) to investigate Coolidge-like phenomena in humans primed with choice of potential online dating partners. We examined two pre-registered hypotheses (https://osf.io/xs74r/files/). First, whether experimentally priming choice (viewing a slideshow of online dating images) directly reduces the attractiveness of familiar preferred sex faces compared to our control condition. Second, whether the predicted effect is stronger for men than women given the role of the Coolidge effect in male sexual motivation5.

AB - Nonhuman species may respond to novel mates with increased sexual motivation (‘The Coolidge Effect1). In humans, novel technological advances, such as online dating platforms, are thought to result in ‘Choice Overload’2. This may undermine the goal of finding a meaningful relationship3, orienting the user toward novel possible partners versus committing to a partner. Here, we used a paradigm measuring change in attraction to familiar faces (i.e. rated on second viewing4) to investigate Coolidge-like phenomena in humans primed with choice of potential online dating partners. We examined two pre-registered hypotheses (https://osf.io/xs74r/files/). First, whether experimentally priming choice (viewing a slideshow of online dating images) directly reduces the attractiveness of familiar preferred sex faces compared to our control condition. Second, whether the predicted effect is stronger for men than women given the role of the Coolidge effect in male sexual motivation5.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Sculley J, Watkins CD, Ritchie KL. Initial experimental evidence that the ability to choose between items alters attraction to familiar versus novel persons in different ways for men and women. 2019. Poster session presented at Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference , Portland, United States.