Is children's acquisition of the passive a staged process? Evidence from six- and nine-year-olds' production of passives

Katherine Messenger, Holly P. Branigan, Janet F. McLean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We report a syntactic priming experiment that examined whether children's acquisition of the passive is a staged process, with acquisition of constituent structure preceding acquisition of thematic role mappings. Six-year-olds and nine-year-olds described transitive actions after hearing active and passive prime descriptions involving the same or different thematic roles. Both groups showed a strong tendency to reuse in their own description the syntactic structure they had just heard, including well-formed passives after passive primes, irrespective of whether thematic roles were repeated between prime and target. However, following passive primes, six-year-olds but not nine-year-olds also produced reversed passives, with well-formed constituent structure but incorrect thematic role mappings. These results suggest that by six, children have mastered the constituent structure of the passive; however, they have not yet mastered the non-canonical thematic role mapping. By nine, children have mastered both the syntactic and thematic dimensions of this structure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)991-1016
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Child Language
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2011

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Syntactic Priming
Syntactic Structure

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Is children's acquisition of the passive a staged process? Evidence from six- and nine-year-olds' production of passives. / Messenger, Katherine; Branigan, Holly P.; McLean, Janet F.

In: Journal of Child Language, Vol. 39, No. 5, 19.12.2011, p. 991-1016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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