Like father, like self

emotional closeness to father, but not mother, predicts women‘s preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces

C.D. Watkins, L. DeBruine, F.G. Smith, B. Jones, J. Vukovic, P. Fraccaro

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Inclusive fitness and optimal outbreeding theories highlight the importance of kin recognition for adaptive behavior. Familial imprinting and self-referential phenotype matching are two potential mechanisms for kin recognition that have been the focus of much research. While studies of human preferences for parental traits provide evidence for familial imprinting, studies of human preferences for computer-manipulated self-resemblance have been interpreted as evidence for self-referential phenotype matching. Because children resemble their parents, familial imprinting could influence preferences for self-resemblance. Here we show that women‘s reported emotional closeness to their father, but not mother, is positively correlated with their preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, individuals. However, preferences for self-resemblance were greater for same-sex than opposite-sex individuals. Collectively, these findings implicate familial imprinting in preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex individuals and raise the possibility that familial imprinting and self-referential phenotype matching have context-specific effects on attitudes to self-resembling individuals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages98
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes
EventThe Human Behavior and Evolution Society 22nd Annual Meeting - University of Oregon, Eugene, United States
Duration: 16 Jun 201020 Jun 2010
Conference number: 22nd
https://www.hbes.com/portfolio-item/22nd-annual-hbes-conference/

Conference

ConferenceThe Human Behavior and Evolution Society 22nd Annual Meeting
Abbreviated titleHBES
CountryUnited States
CityEugene
Period16/06/1020/06/10
Internet address

Fingerprint

Fathers
Mothers
Phenotype
Psychological Adaptation
Parents
Imprinting (Psychology)
Research
Recognition (Psychology)

Cite this

Watkins, C. D., DeBruine, L., Smith, F. G., Jones, B., Vukovic, J., & Fraccaro, P. (2010). Like father, like self: emotional closeness to father, but not mother, predicts women‘s preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces. 98. Poster session presented at The Human Behavior and Evolution Society 22nd Annual Meeting, Eugene, United States.
Watkins, C.D. ; DeBruine, L. ; Smith, F.G. ; Jones, B. ; Vukovic, J. ; Fraccaro, P. / Like father, like self : emotional closeness to father, but not mother, predicts women‘s preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces. Poster session presented at The Human Behavior and Evolution Society 22nd Annual Meeting, Eugene, United States.1 p.
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abstract = "Inclusive fitness and optimal outbreeding theories highlight the importance of kin recognition for adaptive behavior. Familial imprinting and self-referential phenotype matching are two potential mechanisms for kin recognition that have been the focus of much research. While studies of human preferences for parental traits provide evidence for familial imprinting, studies of human preferences for computer-manipulated self-resemblance have been interpreted as evidence for self-referential phenotype matching. Because children resemble their parents, familial imprinting could influence preferences for self-resemblance. Here we show that women‘s reported emotional closeness to their father, but not mother, is positively correlated with their preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, individuals. However, preferences for self-resemblance were greater for same-sex than opposite-sex individuals. Collectively, these findings implicate familial imprinting in preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex individuals and raise the possibility that familial imprinting and self-referential phenotype matching have context-specific effects on attitudes to self-resembling individuals.",
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Watkins, CD, DeBruine, L, Smith, FG, Jones, B, Vukovic, J & Fraccaro, P 2010, 'Like father, like self: emotional closeness to father, but not mother, predicts women‘s preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces' The Human Behavior and Evolution Society 22nd Annual Meeting, Eugene, United States, 16/06/10 - 20/06/10, pp. 98.

Like father, like self : emotional closeness to father, but not mother, predicts women‘s preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces. / Watkins, C.D.; DeBruine, L.; Smith, F.G.; Jones, B.; Vukovic, J.; Fraccaro, P.

2010. 98 Poster session presented at The Human Behavior and Evolution Society 22nd Annual Meeting, Eugene, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Like father, like self

T2 - emotional closeness to father, but not mother, predicts women‘s preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces

AU - Watkins, C.D.

AU - DeBruine, L.

AU - Smith, F.G.

AU - Jones, B.

AU - Vukovic, J.

AU - Fraccaro, P.

PY - 2010/6/20

Y1 - 2010/6/20

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AB - Inclusive fitness and optimal outbreeding theories highlight the importance of kin recognition for adaptive behavior. Familial imprinting and self-referential phenotype matching are two potential mechanisms for kin recognition that have been the focus of much research. While studies of human preferences for parental traits provide evidence for familial imprinting, studies of human preferences for computer-manipulated self-resemblance have been interpreted as evidence for self-referential phenotype matching. Because children resemble their parents, familial imprinting could influence preferences for self-resemblance. Here we show that women‘s reported emotional closeness to their father, but not mother, is positively correlated with their preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, individuals. However, preferences for self-resemblance were greater for same-sex than opposite-sex individuals. Collectively, these findings implicate familial imprinting in preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex individuals and raise the possibility that familial imprinting and self-referential phenotype matching have context-specific effects on attitudes to self-resembling individuals.

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Watkins CD, DeBruine L, Smith FG, Jones B, Vukovic J, Fraccaro P. Like father, like self: emotional closeness to father, but not mother, predicts women‘s preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces. 2010. Poster session presented at The Human Behavior and Evolution Society 22nd Annual Meeting, Eugene, United States.