Like father, like self: emotional closeness to father predicts women's preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex faces

Christopher D. Watkins, Lisa M. DeBruine, Finlay G. Smith, Benedict C. Jones, Jovana Vukovic, Paul J. Fraccaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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52 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Kin recognition is an essential component of kin-directed adaptive behavior. Consequently, potential mechanisms of kin recognition, such as learning a kin phenotype from family members (familial imprinting) or self (self-referential phenotype matching), have been the focus of much research. Studies using computer-manipulated self-resemblance show effects for both same-sex and opposite-sex faces and have been interpreted as evidence for self-referential phenotype matching. However, more recent research on sex-contingent face processing suggests that visual experience with faces of one sex has little influence on perceptions of faces of the other sex, calling into question how self-referential phenotype matching can influence perceptions of opposite-sex faces. Because children resemble their parents, familial imprinting could influence preferences for self-resemblance, reconciling these seemingly incompatible results for sex-contingent face processing and effects of self-resemblance on perceptions of opposite-sex faces. Here we show that women's reported emotional closeness to their father, but not mother, is positively correlated with their preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, individuals. These findings implicate familial imprinting in preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex individuals and raise the possibility that familial imprinting and self-referential phenotype matching have context-specific effects on attitudes to self-resembling individuals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-75
Number of pages6
JournalEvolution and Human Behavior
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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fathers
imprinting
Fathers
phenotype
gender
kin recognition
genomic imprinting
Phenotype
learning
woman
Emotion
Closeness
Resemblance
Psychological Adaptation
Research
effect
Parents
Mothers
Learning

Cite this

Watkins, Christopher D. ; DeBruine, Lisa M. ; Smith, Finlay G. ; Jones, Benedict C. ; Vukovic, Jovana ; Fraccaro, Paul J. / Like father, like self : emotional closeness to father predicts women's preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex faces. In: Evolution and Human Behavior. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 70-75.
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Like father, like self : emotional closeness to father predicts women's preferences for self-resemblance in opposite-sex faces. / Watkins, Christopher D.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Smith, Finlay G.; Jones, Benedict C.; Vukovic, Jovana; Fraccaro, Paul J.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 70-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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