Micro-credit for microenterprises? A study of women "petty" traders in Eastern Nigeria

Nnamdi O. Madichie, Anayo D. Nkamnebe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that constrain women petty traders' access to microcredit, and the innovative measures they have initiated in order to counter these constraints.

Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on in-depth interviews with women micro-entrepreneurs drawn from a convenience sample of 20 petty traders in the market town of Awka - the capital of a state in Eastern Nigeria.

Findings: The paper identifies three main constraints - internal, socio-cultural and policy induced - as the key moderating influences on women petty traders' ability access to micro-credit.

Research limitations/implications: Considering the sample size and research context, the generalisation of the findings may need to be interpreted with caution. However, the paper finds evidence of most of these findings in other studies on other contexts.

Practical implications: This paper posits that the lack of access to credit promotes market exclusion, and deepens the socioeconomic and political vulnerability of women as a consequence. Such vulnerability has prompted these microenterpreneurs into venturing to alternative sources of credit in the form of "Women August Meetings". The paper has far reaching implications for public policy support geared towards "leveraging" and mainstreaming these initiatives for maximum outreach.

Originality/value: Previous research in the area of micro-credit access seem to have paid limited attention to the peculiar challenges of this segment of society, i.e. petty traders, who incidentally also form the bulk of occupants at the bottom-of-the-pyramid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-319
Number of pages19
JournalGender in Management
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nigeria
credit
vulnerability
market
entrepreneur
public policy
exclusion
town
Micro-enterprises
Microcredit
Traders
lack
methodology
ability
interview
evidence
Values
Vulnerability
Access to credit

Cite this

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title = "Micro-credit for microenterprises?: A study of women {"}petty{"} traders in Eastern Nigeria",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that constrain women petty traders' access to microcredit, and the innovative measures they have initiated in order to counter these constraints.Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on in-depth interviews with women micro-entrepreneurs drawn from a convenience sample of 20 petty traders in the market town of Awka - the capital of a state in Eastern Nigeria.Findings: The paper identifies three main constraints - internal, socio-cultural and policy induced - as the key moderating influences on women petty traders' ability access to micro-credit.Research limitations/implications: Considering the sample size and research context, the generalisation of the findings may need to be interpreted with caution. However, the paper finds evidence of most of these findings in other studies on other contexts.Practical implications: This paper posits that the lack of access to credit promotes market exclusion, and deepens the socioeconomic and political vulnerability of women as a consequence. Such vulnerability has prompted these microenterpreneurs into venturing to alternative sources of credit in the form of {"}Women August Meetings{"}. The paper has far reaching implications for public policy support geared towards {"}leveraging{"} and mainstreaming these initiatives for maximum outreach.Originality/value: Previous research in the area of micro-credit access seem to have paid limited attention to the peculiar challenges of this segment of society, i.e. petty traders, who incidentally also form the bulk of occupants at the bottom-of-the-pyramid.",
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Micro-credit for microenterprises? A study of women "petty" traders in Eastern Nigeria. / Madichie, Nnamdi O.; Nkamnebe, Anayo D.

In: Gender in Management, Vol. 25, No. 4, 15.06.2010, p. 301-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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