Neoliberalism, identification process and the dialectics of crisis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Athens, on 6 December 2008, a policeman shot 15-year-old Alexis Grigoropoulos in cold blood and killed him. After the killing, spontaneous protests began in the Greek capital and within days the insurrection had spread all over Greece. Radical actions took place even in the more remote and politically conservative areas. The Greek insurrection was not an isolated and temporary episode, nor an abstraction. This essay reflects on the revolt and endeavours to shed light on the context in which it broke out. It considers it as a result of the crisis of capital and neoliberal values and, at the same time, of our negation of capital and its state — the crisis of capital being produced by our struggles and refusal to identify ourselves with neoliberal norms and values. Considered dialectically, the crisis intensifies our struggles and reproduces the crisis of identification with capitalist bearings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-216
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Urban and Regional Research
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

neoliberalism
dialectics
revolt
abstraction
Greece
protest
Values

Cite this

@article{680be1d6135342d7ae03ca6945c63678,
title = "Neoliberalism, identification process and the dialectics of crisis",
abstract = "In Athens, on 6 December 2008, a policeman shot 15-year-old Alexis Grigoropoulos in cold blood and killed him. After the killing, spontaneous protests began in the Greek capital and within days the insurrection had spread all over Greece. Radical actions took place even in the more remote and politically conservative areas. The Greek insurrection was not an isolated and temporary episode, nor an abstraction. This essay reflects on the revolt and endeavours to shed light on the context in which it broke out. It considers it as a result of the crisis of capital and neoliberal values and, at the same time, of our negation of capital and its state — the crisis of capital being produced by our struggles and refusal to identify ourselves with neoliberal norms and values. Considered dialectically, the crisis intensifies our struggles and reproduces the crisis of identification with capitalist bearings.",
author = "Christos Memos",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/j.1468-2427.2010.00950.x",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "210--216",
journal = "International Journal of Urban and Regional Research",
issn = "0309-1317",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

Neoliberalism, identification process and the dialectics of crisis. / Memos, Christos.

In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Vol. 34, No. 1, 03.2010, p. 210-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neoliberalism, identification process and the dialectics of crisis

AU - Memos, Christos

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - In Athens, on 6 December 2008, a policeman shot 15-year-old Alexis Grigoropoulos in cold blood and killed him. After the killing, spontaneous protests began in the Greek capital and within days the insurrection had spread all over Greece. Radical actions took place even in the more remote and politically conservative areas. The Greek insurrection was not an isolated and temporary episode, nor an abstraction. This essay reflects on the revolt and endeavours to shed light on the context in which it broke out. It considers it as a result of the crisis of capital and neoliberal values and, at the same time, of our negation of capital and its state — the crisis of capital being produced by our struggles and refusal to identify ourselves with neoliberal norms and values. Considered dialectically, the crisis intensifies our struggles and reproduces the crisis of identification with capitalist bearings.

AB - In Athens, on 6 December 2008, a policeman shot 15-year-old Alexis Grigoropoulos in cold blood and killed him. After the killing, spontaneous protests began in the Greek capital and within days the insurrection had spread all over Greece. Radical actions took place even in the more remote and politically conservative areas. The Greek insurrection was not an isolated and temporary episode, nor an abstraction. This essay reflects on the revolt and endeavours to shed light on the context in which it broke out. It considers it as a result of the crisis of capital and neoliberal values and, at the same time, of our negation of capital and its state — the crisis of capital being produced by our struggles and refusal to identify ourselves with neoliberal norms and values. Considered dialectically, the crisis intensifies our struggles and reproduces the crisis of identification with capitalist bearings.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1468-2427.2010.00950.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1468-2427.2010.00950.x

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 210

EP - 216

JO - International Journal of Urban and Regional Research

JF - International Journal of Urban and Regional Research

SN - 0309-1317

IS - 1

ER -