Nigerian restaurants in London: bridging the experiential perception/expectation gap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nigerian restaurants in London have not gained as much popularity as their peers. Indeed they failed to make the top-20 in the marketing intelligence polls between 1999 and 2002. Ironically the acclaimed ‘pioneers’ of Nigerian cuisine have existed for much longer – following the upward trend of African immigrants into the capital. This paper argues that the marketing strategies adopted by these businesses are inconsistent with the real needs of their clientele-base. Thus to improve their experiential marketing record, Nigerian restaurateurs should be more proactive in leveraging their market offerings in order to breakout from the margins to the mainstream.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)258-271
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Business and Globalisation
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Clientele
Margin
Marketing strategy
Marketing intelligence
Africa
Restaurants
Pioneers
Experiential marketing
Expectations gap
Polls
Peers
Immigrants

Cite this

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