Pain and subsequent mortality and cancer among women in the Royal College of General Practitioners Oral Contraception Study

Blair H Smith, Alison M Elliott, Philip C Hannaford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research suggested associations between pain and subsequent all-cause and cancer-specific mortality. This study examined death and cancer development within six years of reporting pain, among women in the Royal College of General Practitioners Oral Contraception Study. We found no associations between 'any' or 'chronic' pain and subsequent all-cause mortality or cancer. We found a higher risk of death from respiratory disease among women reporting pain (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.5), a higher mortality among women reporting chronic chest pain (AOR = 1.75), and a higher risk of subsequent cancer among women reporting head or abdomen pain. Given the high prevalence of pain symptoms, these findings may be important, and warrant further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-46
Number of pages2
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume53
Issue number486
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Contraception
General Practitioners
Pain
Mortality
Neoplasms
Chronic Pain
Odds Ratio
Chest Pain
Research
Abdomen
Head

Cite this

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Pain and subsequent mortality and cancer among women in the Royal College of General Practitioners Oral Contraception Study. / Smith, Blair H; Elliott, Alison M; Hannaford, Philip C.

In: British Journal of General Practice, Vol. 53, No. 486, 01.2003, p. 45-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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