Perception of suprathreshold naturalistic changes in colored natural images

Michelle P.S. To*, P. George Lovell, Tom Troscianko, David J. Tolhurst

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Simple everyday tasks, such as visual search, require a visual system that is sensitive to differences. Here we report how observers perceive changes in natural image stimuli, and what happens if objects change color, position, or identity-i.e., when the external scene changes in a naturalistic manner. We investigated whether a V1-based difference-prediction model can predict the magnitude ratings given by observers to suprathreshold differences in numerous pairs of natural images. The model incorporated contrast normalization and surround suppression, and elongated receptive-elds. Observers' ratings were better predicted when the model included phase invariance, and even more so when the stimuli were inverted and negated to lessen their semantic impact. Some feature changes were better predicted than others: the model systematically underpredicted observers' perception of the magnitude of blur, but over-predicted their ability to report changes in textures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Cite this

To, Michelle P.S. ; George Lovell, P. ; Troscianko, Tom ; Tolhurst, David J. / Perception of suprathreshold naturalistic changes in colored natural images. In: Journal of Vision. 2010 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 1-22.
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Perception of suprathreshold naturalistic changes in colored natural images. / To, Michelle P.S.; George Lovell, P.; Troscianko, Tom; Tolhurst, David J.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 10, No. 4, 14.09.2010, p. 1-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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