Perceptions and actions: combining privacy and risk perceptions to better understand user behaviour

Lynne Coventry, Debora Jeske, Pam Briggs

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Exploring the link between privacy and behaviour has been difficult, as many contextual and other variables lead to a schism between privacy attitudes and behaviour. We propose that one possible means forward is to consider risk perceptions as an important additional dimension when exploring individual differences in privacy concern. Using cluster analysis, we demonstrate the benefit of creating more multi-dimensional user profiles (=clusters) as these can provide a better inside into behaviour. These clusters were able to differentiate users based on both privacy and risk perceptions into users who were (a) highly concerned and risk-sensitive; (b) unconcerned but risk-aware; and (c) moderately concerned but less risk-aware cluster. Using these clusters, we were able to explain different patterns of self-reported behaviours related to technical and general caution. Further analysis of behaviours associated with the use of mobile devices, public networks and social networking in relation to these clusters did not result in any significant findings. We provide a number of topics for discussion and practical solutions that have yet to be implemented in order to better understand the link between privacy attitudes and behaviour.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event10th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security - Facebook Headquarters, Menlo Park, United States
Duration: 9 Jul 201411 Jul 2014
Conference number: 10th
https://cups.cs.cmu.edu/soups/2014/

Conference

Conference10th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security
Abbreviated titleSOUPS 2014
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMenlo Park
Period9/07/1411/07/14
Internet address

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