Prison(er) education: stories of change and transformation

David Wilson (Editor), Anne Wilson (Editor)

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Abstract

    A major collection of writings about the transforming power of education in British prisons. Prison(er) Education comprises key essays by leading prison education practitioners, academics and prisoners, including new work on how to evaluate the ‘success’ of education within prison by Dr Ray Pawson of Leeds University, and Stephen Duguid of Simon Fraser University, Canada. A major challenge to penal policy-makers to accept the value of education - beyond ‘basic skills’, and at a time when prison regimes have come to be dominated by cognitive thinking skills courses. Edited by two leading experts on prison education in the United Kingdom - Professor David Wilson of the University of Central England (a former prison governor and co-presenter of BBC TV’s Crime Squad), and Dr Anne Reuss of the University of Abertay (who previously taught at HM Prison Full Sutton). Weaving anecdote, research and evaluation, Prison(er) Education presents for the first time a comprehensive account of education inside British prisons. At the heart of the book lies the question: ‘Who is prison education for: prison or prisoners?’. This book is a major challenge to penal policy-makers to accept the value of education - beyond 'basic skills', and at a time when regimes have come to be dominated by cognitive thinking skills courses. Weaving anecdote with solid research and evaluation, the book presents for the first time in Britain a comprehensive account of education inside prisons.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationWinchester
    PublisherWaterside Press
    Number of pages192
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Electronic)9781906534592
    ISBN (Print)9781872870908
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

    Keywords

    • Prisons - Great Britain
    • Prisoner education
    • Teaching in prison

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