Researching a segmented market: reflections on telephone interviewing

Rhiannon Lord, Nicola Bolton, Scott Fleming, Melissa Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
26 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this paper was to review the effectiveness of telephone interviewing for capturing data and to consider in particular the challenges faced by telephone interviewers when capturing information about market segments. Design/methodology/approach The platform for this methodological critique was a market segment analysis commissioned by Sport Wales which involved a series of 85 telephone interviews completed during 2010. Two focus groups involving the six interviewers involved in the study were convened to reflect on the researchers’ experiences and the implications for business and management research. Findings There are three principal sets of findings. First, although telephone interviewing is generally a cost-effective data collection method, it is important to consider both the actual costs (i.e. time spent planning and conducting interviews) as well as the opportunity costs (i.e. missed appointments, “chasing participants”). Second, researchers need to be sensitised to and sensitive to the demographic characteristics of telephone interviewees (insofar as these are knowable) because responses are influenced by them. Third, the anonymity of telephone interviews may be more conducive for discussing sensitive issues than face-to-face interactions. Originality/value The present study adds to this modest body of literature on the implementation of telephone interviewing as a research technique of business and management. It provides valuable methodological background detail about the intricate, personal experiences of researchers undertaking this method “at a distance” and without visual cues, and makes explicit the challenges of telephone interviewing for the purposes of data capture.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)786-802
Number of pages17
JournalManagement Research Review
Volume39
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jul 2016

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Telephone
Segmented markets
Interviewing
Market segments
Focus groups
Information market
Anonymity
Design methodology
Time costs
Management research
Interaction
Planning
Business research
Demographic characteristics
Data collection
Wales
Opportunity cost

Cite this

Lord, Rhiannon ; Bolton, Nicola ; Fleming, Scott ; Anderson, Melissa. / Researching a segmented market : reflections on telephone interviewing. In: Management Research Review. 2016 ; Vol. 39, No. 7. pp. 786-802.
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Researching a segmented market : reflections on telephone interviewing. / Lord, Rhiannon; Bolton, Nicola; Fleming, Scott; Anderson, Melissa.

In: Management Research Review, Vol. 39, No. 7, 19.07.2016, p. 786-802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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