Researching ‘bogus’ asylum seekers, ‘illegal’ migrants and ‘crimmigrants’

Monish Bhatia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)
33 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Both immigration and criminal laws are, at their core, systems of inclusion and exclusion. They are designed to determine whether and how to include individuals as members of society or exclude them from it, thereby, creating insiders and outsiders (Stumpf 2006). Both are designed to create distinct categories of people — innocent versus guilty, admitted versus excluded or, as majority would say, ‘legal’ versus ‘illegal’ (Stumpf 2006). Viewed in that light, perhaps it is not surprising that these two areas of law have become inextrica- bly connected in the official discourses. When politicians and policy makers (and also law enforcement authorities and tabloid press) seek to raise the barriers for non-citizens to attain membership in society, it is unremarkable that they turn their attention to an area of the law that similarly func- tions to exclude the ‘other’ — transforming immigrants into ‘crimmigrants’.1 As a criminological researcher one then has to rise up to the challenges of disentangling these so-called officially constructed (pseudo) realities, and breaking free from a continued dominance of authoritative discourses, and developing an alternative understanding of ‘crimmigration’ by connecting the processes of criminal is ation and ‘other ing’ with poverty, xe no-racism and other forms of social exclusion (see Institute of Race Relations 1987; Richmond 1994; Fekete 2001; Bowling and Phillips 2002; Sivanandan 2002; Weber and Bowling 2004).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReflexivity in criminological research
Subtitle of host publicationexperiences with the powerful and the powerless
EditorsKaren Lumsden, Aaron Winter
Place of PublicationBasingstoke
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter13
Pages162-177
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781137379405
ISBN (Print)9781349478743, 9781137379399
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Oct 2014

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asylum seeker
exclusion
migrant
immigration law
Law
discourse
criminal law
law enforcement
racism
politician
immigrant
inclusion
poverty
Society

Cite this

Bhatia, M. (2014). Researching ‘bogus’ asylum seekers, ‘illegal’ migrants and ‘crimmigrants’. In K. Lumsden, & A. Winter (Eds.), Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless (pp. 162-177). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137379405_13
Bhatia, Monish. / Researching ‘bogus’ asylum seekers, ‘illegal’ migrants and ‘crimmigrants’. Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless. editor / Karen Lumsden ; Aaron Winter. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. pp. 162-177
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Bhatia, M 2014, Researching ‘bogus’ asylum seekers, ‘illegal’ migrants and ‘crimmigrants’. in K Lumsden & A Winter (eds), Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, pp. 162-177. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137379405_13

Researching ‘bogus’ asylum seekers, ‘illegal’ migrants and ‘crimmigrants’. / Bhatia, Monish.

Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless. ed. / Karen Lumsden; Aaron Winter. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. p. 162-177.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Bhatia M. Researching ‘bogus’ asylum seekers, ‘illegal’ migrants and ‘crimmigrants’. In Lumsden K, Winter A, editors, Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 2014. p. 162-177 https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137379405_13