Simulating the "sliding doors" effect through magnetic flux emergence

David MacTaggart, Alan W. Hood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 16 Citations

Abstract

Recent Hinode photospheric vector magnetogram observations have shown that the opposite polarities of a long arcade structuremove apart and then come together. In addition to this “sliding doors” effect, orientations of horizontal magnetic fields along the polarity inversion line on the photosphere evolve from a normal-polarity configuration to an inverse one. To explain this behavior, a simple model by Okamoto et al. suggested that it is the result of the emergence of a twisted flux rope. Here, we model this scenario using a three-dimensional megnatohydrodynamic simulation of a twisted flux rope emerging into a pre-existing overlying arcade. We construct magnetograms from the simulation and compare them with the observations. The model produces the two signatures mentioned above. However, the cause of the “sliding doors” effect differs from the previous model.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)L219-L222
Number of pages4
JournalAstrophysical Journal Letters
Volume716
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

sliding
polarity
magnetic signatures
simulation
photosphere
magnetic flux
emerging
signatures
inversions
causes
configurations
magnetic fields
magnetic field

Cite this

MacTaggart, David; Hood, Alan W. / Simulating the "sliding doors" effect through magnetic flux emergence.

In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, Vol. 716, No. 2, 06.2010, p. L219-L222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{387f594d25154e35bd5d2e78fe122780,
title = "Simulating the {"}sliding doors{"} effect through magnetic flux emergence",
abstract = "Recent Hinode photospheric vector magnetogram observations have shown that the opposite polarities of a long arcade structuremove apart and then come together. In addition to this “sliding doors” effect, orientations of horizontal magnetic fields along the polarity inversion line on the photosphere evolve from a normal-polarity configuration to an inverse one. To explain this behavior, a simple model by Okamoto et al. suggested that it is the result of the emergence of a twisted flux rope. Here, we model this scenario using a three-dimensional megnatohydrodynamic simulation of a twisted flux rope emerging into a pre-existing overlying arcade. We construct magnetograms from the simulation and compare them with the observations. The model produces the two signatures mentioned above. However, the cause of the “sliding doors” effect differs from the previous model.",
author = "David MacTaggart and Hood, {Alan W.}",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1088/2041-8205/716/2/L219",
volume = "716",
pages = "L219--L222",
journal = "Astrophysical Journal Letters",
issn = "2041-8205",
publisher = "IOP Publishing Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

Simulating the "sliding doors" effect through magnetic flux emergence. / MacTaggart, David; Hood, Alan W.

In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, Vol. 716, No. 2, 06.2010, p. L219-L222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Simulating the "sliding doors" effect through magnetic flux emergence

AU - MacTaggart,David

AU - Hood,Alan W.

PY - 2010/6

Y1 - 2010/6

N2 - Recent Hinode photospheric vector magnetogram observations have shown that the opposite polarities of a long arcade structuremove apart and then come together. In addition to this “sliding doors” effect, orientations of horizontal magnetic fields along the polarity inversion line on the photosphere evolve from a normal-polarity configuration to an inverse one. To explain this behavior, a simple model by Okamoto et al. suggested that it is the result of the emergence of a twisted flux rope. Here, we model this scenario using a three-dimensional megnatohydrodynamic simulation of a twisted flux rope emerging into a pre-existing overlying arcade. We construct magnetograms from the simulation and compare them with the observations. The model produces the two signatures mentioned above. However, the cause of the “sliding doors” effect differs from the previous model.

AB - Recent Hinode photospheric vector magnetogram observations have shown that the opposite polarities of a long arcade structuremove apart and then come together. In addition to this “sliding doors” effect, orientations of horizontal magnetic fields along the polarity inversion line on the photosphere evolve from a normal-polarity configuration to an inverse one. To explain this behavior, a simple model by Okamoto et al. suggested that it is the result of the emergence of a twisted flux rope. Here, we model this scenario using a three-dimensional megnatohydrodynamic simulation of a twisted flux rope emerging into a pre-existing overlying arcade. We construct magnetograms from the simulation and compare them with the observations. The model produces the two signatures mentioned above. However, the cause of the “sliding doors” effect differs from the previous model.

U2 - 10.1088/2041-8205/716/2/L219

DO - 10.1088/2041-8205/716/2/L219

M3 - Article

VL - 716

SP - L219-L222

JO - Astrophysical Journal Letters

T2 - Astrophysical Journal Letters

JF - Astrophysical Journal Letters

SN - 2041-8205

IS - 2

ER -