'Sometimes forbidden fruit tastes the sweetest, doesn't it?' Breaking Bad: the transgressive journey of Walter White

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Abstract

This article addresses some of the key moments in the first two seasons of Breaking Bad (2008-2013). It utilises the concept of the liminal subject to address the ways in which protagonist Walter White’s actions disrupt and trouble the boundaries between criminal and conforming behaviour; in so doing, it suggests that the series’ narrative framework orients viewers’ attention toward a sociological, rather than a populist understanding of crime and deviance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-27
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Studies Today
Volume23
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2014

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Liminal
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Populist
Deviance
Crime
Journey
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title = "'Sometimes forbidden fruit tastes the sweetest, doesn't it?' Breaking Bad: the transgressive journey of Walter White",
abstract = "This article addresses some of the key moments in the first two seasons of Breaking Bad (2008-2013). It utilises the concept of the liminal subject to address the ways in which protagonist Walter White’s actions disrupt and trouble the boundaries between criminal and conforming behaviour; in so doing, it suggests that the series’ narrative framework orients viewers’ attention toward a sociological, rather than a populist understanding of crime and deviance.",
author = "Hazel Work",
year = "2014",
month = "6",
day = "30",
language = "English",
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pages = "19--27",
journal = "American Studies Today",
issn = "2044-8031",
publisher = "Liverpool John Moores University",

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AB - This article addresses some of the key moments in the first two seasons of Breaking Bad (2008-2013). It utilises the concept of the liminal subject to address the ways in which protagonist Walter White’s actions disrupt and trouble the boundaries between criminal and conforming behaviour; in so doing, it suggests that the series’ narrative framework orients viewers’ attention toward a sociological, rather than a populist understanding of crime and deviance.

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