Striking a chord

digitisation in music heritage

Kenneth B. McAlpine

Research output: Other contribution

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Abstract

Musical instruments have long proved a source of fascination for adults and children alike. Who amongst us hasn’t felt the urge to reach out and tap a drum or rattle off a quick rendition of ‘chopsticks’ when confronted with a keyboard? However, for curators and custodians, musical instruments present something of a challenge. On the one hand, they have a duty of care to preserve historical instruments for future generations, but if this is achieved from behind the safety of a glass case, the very things that make the instrument interesting are stripped from it and it becomes just an ornate piece of furniture. This is where music technology can lend a hand, and in this talk Dr Kenny Mcalpine will explore a method for capturing and repackaging the sound and playing characteristics of historic keyboard instruments, and how the resulting digital models might complement a traditional music collection.
Original languageEnglish
TypeDundee Arts Cafe series talks
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2011

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Digitization
Music
Heritage
Musical Instruments
Keyboard
Outreach
Historic
Rattle
Drum
Sound
Safety
Music Technology
Traditional music
Rendition
Future Generations

Cite this

McAlpine, K. B. (2011, Jun 7). Striking a chord: digitisation in music heritage.
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Striking a chord : digitisation in music heritage. / McAlpine, Kenneth B.

2011, Dundee Arts Cafe series talks.

Research output: Other contribution

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AB - Musical instruments have long proved a source of fascination for adults and children alike. Who amongst us hasn’t felt the urge to reach out and tap a drum or rattle off a quick rendition of ‘chopsticks’ when confronted with a keyboard? However, for curators and custodians, musical instruments present something of a challenge. On the one hand, they have a duty of care to preserve historical instruments for future generations, but if this is achieved from behind the safety of a glass case, the very things that make the instrument interesting are stripped from it and it becomes just an ornate piece of furniture. This is where music technology can lend a hand, and in this talk Dr Kenny Mcalpine will explore a method for capturing and repackaging the sound and playing characteristics of historic keyboard instruments, and how the resulting digital models might complement a traditional music collection.

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