Student health professionals' attitudes and experience after watching 'Ida's diary', a first-person account of living with borderline personality disorder: mixed methods study

Geoffrey L. Dickens, Emma Lamont, Fiona J. Stirling

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the use of commercial movies in nursing education, or 'cinenurducation'. There is a need for educational interventions which target mental health nurses' attitudes towards people with borderline personality disorder.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate and evaluate the experience and effects of attendance at a screening of the movie Ida’s Diary, a first-person account of living with borderline personality disorder.

DESIGN: Mixed methods design comprising a within-subjects AB longitudinal survey, and a qualitative analysis of participant-generated data and researcher field notes from a World Ca-fé discussion group.

SETTINGS: One university in Scotland.

PARTICIPANTS: N=66 undergraduate and postgraduate mental health nursing and coun-selling students.

METHODS: Participants completed measures of cognitive and emotional attitudes towards, and knowledge about, people with borderline personality disorder before and after one of two film screenings. We conducted a World Café discussion group after the second screen-ing. Resulting data were subject to a qualitative thematic analysis.

RESULTS: Quantitative analysis revealed a five-factor cognitive and a single-factor emo-tional attitude structure. Cognitive-attitudinal items related to treatment deservingness and value of mixed treatment approaches improved across iterations. Total knowledge score did not change, but one item about borderline personality disorder as a precursor to schizophrenia received considerably more incorrect endorsement post-screening. Qualitative analysis re-vealed five themes: Facilitation and inhibition of learning; promotion but not satiation of appe-tite for knowledge; challenging existing understanding; prompting creativity and anxiety; and initiating thinking about the bigger picture.

CONCLUSIONS: Participants found the film thought provoking; it increased their appetite for knowledge. Findings suggest that screening should be delivered in conjunction with more didactic information about borderline personality disorder.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-135
Number of pages8
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume65
Early online date13 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

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Attitude to Health
Borderline Personality Disorder
personality disorder
health professionals
Students
human being
Motion Pictures
experience
movies
student
group discussion
nursing
mental health
Satiation
Psychiatric Nursing
cognitive factors
Creativity
Nursing Education
Scotland
Appetite

Cite this

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title = "Student health professionals' attitudes and experience after watching 'Ida's diary', a first-person account of living with borderline personality disorder: mixed methods study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the use of commercial movies in nursing education, or 'cinenurducation'. There is a need for educational interventions which target mental health nurses' attitudes towards people with borderline personality disorder.OBJECTIVES: To investigate and evaluate the experience and effects of attendance at a screening of the movie Ida’s Diary, a first-person account of living with borderline personality disorder.DESIGN: Mixed methods design comprising a within-subjects AB longitudinal survey, and a qualitative analysis of participant-generated data and researcher field notes from a World Ca-f{\'e} discussion group.SETTINGS: One university in Scotland.PARTICIPANTS: N=66 undergraduate and postgraduate mental health nursing and coun-selling students.METHODS: Participants completed measures of cognitive and emotional attitudes towards, and knowledge about, people with borderline personality disorder before and after one of two film screenings. We conducted a World Caf{\'e} discussion group after the second screen-ing. Resulting data were subject to a qualitative thematic analysis.RESULTS: Quantitative analysis revealed a five-factor cognitive and a single-factor emo-tional attitude structure. Cognitive-attitudinal items related to treatment deservingness and value of mixed treatment approaches improved across iterations. Total knowledge score did not change, but one item about borderline personality disorder as a precursor to schizophrenia received considerably more incorrect endorsement post-screening. Qualitative analysis re-vealed five themes: Facilitation and inhibition of learning; promotion but not satiation of appe-tite for knowledge; challenging existing understanding; prompting creativity and anxiety; and initiating thinking about the bigger picture.CONCLUSIONS: Participants found the film thought provoking; it increased their appetite for knowledge. Findings suggest that screening should be delivered in conjunction with more didactic information about borderline personality disorder.",
author = "Dickens, {Geoffrey L.} and Emma Lamont and Stirling, {Fiona J.}",
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AU - Lamont, Emma

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N2 - BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the use of commercial movies in nursing education, or 'cinenurducation'. There is a need for educational interventions which target mental health nurses' attitudes towards people with borderline personality disorder.OBJECTIVES: To investigate and evaluate the experience and effects of attendance at a screening of the movie Ida’s Diary, a first-person account of living with borderline personality disorder.DESIGN: Mixed methods design comprising a within-subjects AB longitudinal survey, and a qualitative analysis of participant-generated data and researcher field notes from a World Ca-fé discussion group.SETTINGS: One university in Scotland.PARTICIPANTS: N=66 undergraduate and postgraduate mental health nursing and coun-selling students.METHODS: Participants completed measures of cognitive and emotional attitudes towards, and knowledge about, people with borderline personality disorder before and after one of two film screenings. We conducted a World Café discussion group after the second screen-ing. Resulting data were subject to a qualitative thematic analysis.RESULTS: Quantitative analysis revealed a five-factor cognitive and a single-factor emo-tional attitude structure. Cognitive-attitudinal items related to treatment deservingness and value of mixed treatment approaches improved across iterations. Total knowledge score did not change, but one item about borderline personality disorder as a precursor to schizophrenia received considerably more incorrect endorsement post-screening. Qualitative analysis re-vealed five themes: Facilitation and inhibition of learning; promotion but not satiation of appe-tite for knowledge; challenging existing understanding; prompting creativity and anxiety; and initiating thinking about the bigger picture.CONCLUSIONS: Participants found the film thought provoking; it increased their appetite for knowledge. Findings suggest that screening should be delivered in conjunction with more didactic information about borderline personality disorder.

AB - BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the use of commercial movies in nursing education, or 'cinenurducation'. There is a need for educational interventions which target mental health nurses' attitudes towards people with borderline personality disorder.OBJECTIVES: To investigate and evaluate the experience and effects of attendance at a screening of the movie Ida’s Diary, a first-person account of living with borderline personality disorder.DESIGN: Mixed methods design comprising a within-subjects AB longitudinal survey, and a qualitative analysis of participant-generated data and researcher field notes from a World Ca-fé discussion group.SETTINGS: One university in Scotland.PARTICIPANTS: N=66 undergraduate and postgraduate mental health nursing and coun-selling students.METHODS: Participants completed measures of cognitive and emotional attitudes towards, and knowledge about, people with borderline personality disorder before and after one of two film screenings. We conducted a World Café discussion group after the second screen-ing. Resulting data were subject to a qualitative thematic analysis.RESULTS: Quantitative analysis revealed a five-factor cognitive and a single-factor emo-tional attitude structure. Cognitive-attitudinal items related to treatment deservingness and value of mixed treatment approaches improved across iterations. Total knowledge score did not change, but one item about borderline personality disorder as a precursor to schizophrenia received considerably more incorrect endorsement post-screening. Qualitative analysis re-vealed five themes: Facilitation and inhibition of learning; promotion but not satiation of appe-tite for knowledge; challenging existing understanding; prompting creativity and anxiety; and initiating thinking about the bigger picture.CONCLUSIONS: Participants found the film thought provoking; it increased their appetite for knowledge. Findings suggest that screening should be delivered in conjunction with more didactic information about borderline personality disorder.

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