Student nurses' gender-based accounts of men in nursing

Andy McKinlay, Sue Cowan, Chris McVittie, Robin M. Ion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)
14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Stereotypes of nursing as a female profession and of male nurses as gay can limit male recruitment. This UK-based focus-group study examines whether student nurses reproduce or challenge such views. Using discourse analysis, discussion transcript segments dealing with male nurses’ gender or sexuality were examined for turn design, sequential organization, and procedural relevance. Results showed participants characterized such stereotypical constructions of male nurses as held only by other people. They themselves, however, used gender-based distinctions to problematic male nursing. These findings indicate nursing students would benefit from training which emphasizes the positioning of men and women within society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-349
Number of pages5
JournalProcedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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male nurse
Male Nurses
Nursing
nursing
nurse
Nurses
Students
gender
female profession
student
Nursing Students
Sexuality
study group
Focus Groups
discourse analysis
stereotype
sexuality
organization

Cite this

McKinlay, Andy ; Cowan, Sue ; McVittie, Chris ; Ion, Robin M. / Student nurses' gender-based accounts of men in nursing. In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences. 2010 ; Vol. 5. pp. 345-349.
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Student nurses' gender-based accounts of men in nursing. / McKinlay, Andy; Cowan, Sue; McVittie, Chris; Ion, Robin M.

In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, Vol. 5, 2010, p. 345-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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