Supporting on-campus courses with WebCT

Petra Leimich

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

Abstract

WebCT can be used as an effective means of support for courses delivered face-to-face, on-campus, provided it is integrated with the more traditional delivery and assessment modes used along side. Using four courses developed for IT students at the Abertay University as examples, we will discuss how both students and staff can benefit. Furthermore, we will analyse the pertinent success factors and suggest possible content and design guidelines. Current courses have been developed incrementally over the last four years, and delivered to over 1100 students. They are based on existing PowerPoint lectures and Word documents, which are integrated into a simple structure within WebCT and enhanced with additional resources such as self-assessment quizzes, downloads, web links, and a discussion forum. We have found that this model provides an effective framework which encourages students to engage more deeply with the subject matter and learn more independently, and can personalise the learning experience for students in large classes. This is reflected in very positive student feedback. With some basic administrative support from Information Services, this model is also successful for academic staff as it is cost-neutral – it minimises the extra cost in staff time, and requires comparatively little staff development, while enabling the use of time-saving feedback and communication tools.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

staff
student
quiz
self-assessment
costs
information service
communication
resources
learning
experience
time

Cite this

@conference{09a8ff217a814606833d8c9705c98513,
title = "Supporting on-campus courses with WebCT",
abstract = "WebCT can be used as an effective means of support for courses delivered face-to-face, on-campus, provided it is integrated with the more traditional delivery and assessment modes used along side. Using four courses developed for IT students at the Abertay University as examples, we will discuss how both students and staff can benefit. Furthermore, we will analyse the pertinent success factors and suggest possible content and design guidelines. Current courses have been developed incrementally over the last four years, and delivered to over 1100 students. They are based on existing PowerPoint lectures and Word documents, which are integrated into a simple structure within WebCT and enhanced with additional resources such as self-assessment quizzes, downloads, web links, and a discussion forum. We have found that this model provides an effective framework which encourages students to engage more deeply with the subject matter and learn more independently, and can personalise the learning experience for students in large classes. This is reflected in very positive student feedback. With some basic administrative support from Information Services, this model is also successful for academic staff as it is cost-neutral – it minimises the extra cost in staff time, and requires comparatively little staff development, while enabling the use of time-saving feedback and communication tools.",
author = "Petra Leimich",
year = "2003",
language = "English",

}

Supporting on-campus courses with WebCT. / Leimich, Petra.

2003.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

TY - CONF

T1 - Supporting on-campus courses with WebCT

AU - Leimich, Petra

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - WebCT can be used as an effective means of support for courses delivered face-to-face, on-campus, provided it is integrated with the more traditional delivery and assessment modes used along side. Using four courses developed for IT students at the Abertay University as examples, we will discuss how both students and staff can benefit. Furthermore, we will analyse the pertinent success factors and suggest possible content and design guidelines. Current courses have been developed incrementally over the last four years, and delivered to over 1100 students. They are based on existing PowerPoint lectures and Word documents, which are integrated into a simple structure within WebCT and enhanced with additional resources such as self-assessment quizzes, downloads, web links, and a discussion forum. We have found that this model provides an effective framework which encourages students to engage more deeply with the subject matter and learn more independently, and can personalise the learning experience for students in large classes. This is reflected in very positive student feedback. With some basic administrative support from Information Services, this model is also successful for academic staff as it is cost-neutral – it minimises the extra cost in staff time, and requires comparatively little staff development, while enabling the use of time-saving feedback and communication tools.

AB - WebCT can be used as an effective means of support for courses delivered face-to-face, on-campus, provided it is integrated with the more traditional delivery and assessment modes used along side. Using four courses developed for IT students at the Abertay University as examples, we will discuss how both students and staff can benefit. Furthermore, we will analyse the pertinent success factors and suggest possible content and design guidelines. Current courses have been developed incrementally over the last four years, and delivered to over 1100 students. They are based on existing PowerPoint lectures and Word documents, which are integrated into a simple structure within WebCT and enhanced with additional resources such as self-assessment quizzes, downloads, web links, and a discussion forum. We have found that this model provides an effective framework which encourages students to engage more deeply with the subject matter and learn more independently, and can personalise the learning experience for students in large classes. This is reflected in very positive student feedback. With some basic administrative support from Information Services, this model is also successful for academic staff as it is cost-neutral – it minimises the extra cost in staff time, and requires comparatively little staff development, while enabling the use of time-saving feedback and communication tools.

M3 - Other

ER -